Texas Administrative Code Title 19

Education: As effective August 6, 2010

Chapter 74

Subchapter A

§74.1: Essential Knowledge and Skills

(a) A school district that offers kindergarten through Grade 12 must offer the following as a required curriculum:

(1) a foundation curriculum that includes:

(A) English language arts;

(B) mathematics;

(C) science; and

(D) social studies, consisting of Texas, United States and world history, government, and geography; and

(2) an enrichment curriculum that includes:

(A) to the extent possible, languages other than English;

(B) health, with emphasis on the importance of proper nutrition and exercise;

(C) physical education;

(D) fine arts;

(E) economics, with emphasis on the free enterprise system and its benefits;

(F) career and technical education;

(G) technology applications; and

(H) religious literature, including the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament) and New Testament, and its impact on history and literature.

(b) A school district must provide instruction in the essential knowledge and skills of the appropriate grade levels in the foundation and enrichment curriculum as specified in paragraphs (1)-(13) of this subsection. A school district may add elements at its discretion but must not delete or omit instruction in the foundation and enrichment curriculum specified in subsection (a) of this section.

(1) Chapter 110 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for English Language Arts and Reading);

(2) Chapter 111 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Mathematics);

(3) Chapter 112 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Science);

(4) Chapter 113 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Social Studies);

(5) Chapter 114 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Languages Other Than English);

(6) Chapter 115 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Health Education);

(7) Chapter 116 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Physical Education);

(8) Chapter 117 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Fine Arts);

(9) Chapter 118 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Economics with Emphasis on the Free Enterprise System and Its Benefits);

(10) Chapter 126 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Applications);

(11) Chapter 127 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Career Development);

(12) Chapter 128 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Spanish Language Arts and English as a Second Language); and

(13) Chapter 130 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Career and Technical Education).

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.1 adopted to be effective September 1, 1996, 21 TexReg 4311; amended to be effective September 1, 1998, 23 TexReg 5675; amended to be effective October 3, 2004, 29 TexReg 9185; amended to be effective January 9, 2007, 32 TexReg 80; amended to be effective April 21, 2010, 35 TexReg 3028

§74.2: Description of a Required Elementary Curriculum

A school district that offers kindergarten through Grade 5 must provide instruction in the required curriculum as specified in §74.1 of this title (relating to Essential Knowledge and Skills). The district must ensure that sufficient time is provided for teachers to teach and for students to learn English language arts and reading, mathematics, science, social studies, fine arts, health, physical education, technology applications, and to the extent possible, languages other than English. The school district may provide instruction in a variety of arrangements and settings, including mixed-age programs designed to permit flexible learning arrangements for developmentally appropriate instruction for all student populations to support student attainment of course and grade level standards.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.2 adopted to be effective September 1, 1996, 21 TexReg 4311; amended to be effective September 1, 1998, 23 TexReg 5675; amended to be effective January 9, 2007, 32 TexReg 80

§74.3: Description of a Required Secondary Curriculum

(a) Middle Grades 6-8.

(1) A school district that offers Grades 6-8 must provide instruction in the required curriculum as specified in §74.1 of this title (relating to Essential Knowledge and Skills). The district must ensure that sufficient time is provided for teachers to teach and for students to learn English language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, fine arts, health, physical education, technology applications, and to the extent possible, languages other than English. The school district may provide instruction in a variety of arrangements and settings, including mixed-age programs designed to permit flexible learning arrangements for developmentally appropriate instruction for all student populations to support student attainment of course and grade level standards.

(2) The school district must ensure that, beginning with students who enter Grade 6 in the 2010-2011 school year, each student completes one Texas essential knowledge and skills-based fine arts course in Grade 6, Grade 7, or Grade 8.

(b) Secondary Grades 9-12.

(1) A school district that offers Grades 9-12 must provide instruction in the required curriculum as specified in §74.1 of this title. The district must ensure that sufficient time is provided for teachers to teach and for students to learn the subjects in the required curriculum. The school district may provide instruction in a variety of arrangements and settings, including mixed-age programs designed to permit flexible learning arrangements for developmentally appropriate instruction for all student populations to support student attainment of course and grade level standards.

(2) The school district must offer the courses listed in this paragraph and maintain evidence that students have the opportunity to take these courses:

(A) English language arts--English I, II, III, and IV;

(B) mathematics--Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, Precalculus, and Mathematical Models with Applications;

(C) science--Integrated Physics and Chemistry, Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. Science courses shall include at least 40% hands-on laboratory investigations and field work using appropriate scientific inquiry;

(D) social studies--United States History Studies Since Reconstruction, World History Studies, United States Government, and World Geography Studies;

(E) economics, with emphasis on the free enterprise system and its benefits--Economics with Emphasis on the Free Enterprise System and Its Benefits;

(F) physical education--at least two courses selected from Foundations of Personal Fitness, Adventure/Outdoor Education, Aerobic Activities, or Team or Individual Sports;

(G) health education--Health 1;

(H) fine arts--courses selected from at least two of the four fine arts areas (art, music, theatre, and dance)--Art I, II, III, IV; Music I, II, III, IV; Theatre I, II, III, IV; or Dance I, II, III, IV;

(I) career and technical education--coherent sequences of courses selected from at least three of the following sixteen career clusters:

(i) Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources;

(ii) Architecture and Construction;

(iii) Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications;

(iv) Business Management and Administration;

(v) Education and Training;

(vi) Finance;

(vii) Government and Public Administration;

(viii) Health Science;

(ix) Hospitality and Tourism;

(x) Human Services;

(xi) Information Technology;

(xii) Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security;

(xiii) Manufacturing;

(xiv) Marketing;

(xv) Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics; and

(xvi) Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics.

(J) languages other than English--Levels I, II, and III or higher of the same language;

(K) technology applications--at least four courses selected from Computer Science I, Computer Science II, Desktop Publishing, Digital Graphics/Animation, Multimedia, Video Technology, Web Mastering, or Independent Study in Technology Applications; and

(L) speech--Communication Applications.

(3) Districts may offer additional courses from the complete list of courses approved by the State Board of Education to satisfy graduation requirements as referenced in this chapter.

(4) The school district must provide each student the opportunity to participate in all courses listed in subsection (b)(2) of this section. The district must provide students the opportunity each year to select courses in which they intend to participate from a list that includes all courses required to be offered in subsection (b)(2) of this section. If the school district will not offer the required courses every year, but intends to offer particular courses only every other year, it must notify all enrolled students of that fact. The school district must teach a course in which ten or more students indicate they will participate or that is required for a student to graduate. For a course in which fewer than ten students indicate they will participate, the district must either teach the course or employ options described in Subchapter C of this chapter (relating to Other Provisions) to provide the course and must maintain evidence that it is employing those options.

(5) For students entering Grade 9 beginning with the 2007-2008 school year, districts must ensure that one or more courses offered in the required curriculum for the recommended and advanced high school programs include a research writing component.

(c) Courses in the foundation and enrichment curriculum in Grades 6-12 must be provided in a manner that allows all grade promotion and high school graduation requirements to be met in a timely manner. Nothing in this chapter shall be construed to require a district to offer a specific course in the foundation and enrichment curriculum except as required by this subsection.

(d) Notwithstanding any other graduation requirements in this chapter, a student is required to complete one credit in physical education to satisfy the graduation requirements under the recommended high school program. A student is also not required to complete one-half credit of health or one credit of technology applications to satisfy the graduation requirements under the recommended high school program. A student entering Grade 9 in the 2010-2011 school year and thereafter and who opts into the minimum high school program must complete one fine arts credit to satisfy the graduation requirements.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.3 adopted to be effective September 1, 1996, 21 TexReg 4311; amended to be effective October 13, 1997, 22 TexReg 10129; amended to be effective September 1, 1998, 23 TexReg 5675; amended to be effective September 1, 2001, 25 TexReg 7691; amended to be effective October 3, 2004, 29 TexReg 9185; amended to be effective January 9, 2007, 32 TexReg 80; amended to be effective December 23, 2009, 34 TexReg 9198; amended to be effective April 21, 2010, 35 TexReg 3028

§74.4: English Language Proficiency Standards

(a) Introduction.

(1) The English language proficiency standards in this section outline English language proficiency level descriptors and student expectations for English language learners (ELLs). School districts shall implement this section as an integral part of each subject in the required curriculum. The English language proficiency standards are to be published along with the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) for each subject in the required curriculum.

(2) In order for ELLs to be successful, they must acquire both social and academic language proficiency in English. Social language proficiency in English consists of the English needed for daily social interactions. Academic language proficiency consists of the English needed to think critically, understand and learn new concepts, process complex academic material, and interact and communicate in English academic settings.

(3) Classroom instruction that effectively integrates second language acquisition with quality content area instruction ensures that ELLs acquire social and academic language proficiency in English, learn the knowledge and skills in the TEKS, and reach their full academic potential.

(4) Effective instruction in second language acquisition involves giving ELLs opportunities to listen, speak, read, and write at their current levels of English development while gradually increasing the linguistic complexity of the English they read and hear, and are expected to speak and write.

(5) The cross-curricular second language acquisition skills in subsection (c) of this section apply to ELLs in Kindergarten-Grade 12.

(6) The English language proficiency levels of beginning, intermediate, advanced, and advanced high are not grade-specific. ELLs may exhibit different proficiency levels within the language domains of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The proficiency level descriptors outlined in subsection (d) of this section show the progression of second language acquisition from one proficiency level to the next and serve as a road map to help content area teachers instruct ELLs commensurate with students' linguistic needs.

(b) School district responsibilities. In fulfilling the requirements of this section, school districts shall:

(1) identify the student's English language proficiency levels in the domains of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in accordance with the proficiency level descriptors for the beginning, intermediate, advanced, and advanced high levels delineated in subsection (d) of this section;

(2) provide instruction in the knowledge and skills of the foundation and enrichment curriculum in a manner that is linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's levels of English language proficiency to ensure that the student learns the knowledge and skills in the required curriculum;

(3) provide content-based instruction including the cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills in subsection (c) of this section in a manner that is linguistically accommodated to help the student acquire English language proficiency; and

(4) provide intensive and ongoing foundational second language acquisition instruction to ELLs in Grade 3 or higher who are at the beginning or intermediate level of English language proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and/or writing as determined by the state's English language proficiency assessment system. These ELLs require focused, targeted, and systematic second language acquisition instruction to provide them with the foundation of English language vocabulary, grammar, syntax, and English mechanics necessary to support content-based instruction and accelerated learning of English.

(c) Cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills.

(1) Cross-curricular second language acquisition/learning strategies. The ELL uses language learning strategies to develop an awareness of his or her own learning processes in all content areas. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:

(A) use prior knowledge and experiences to understand meanings in English;

(B) monitor oral and written language production and employ self-corrective techniques or other resources;

(C) use strategic learning techniques such as concept mapping, drawing, memorizing, comparing, contrasting, and reviewing to acquire basic and grade-level vocabulary;

(D) speak using learning strategies such as requesting assistance, employing non-verbal cues, and using synonyms and circumlocution (conveying ideas by defining or describing when exact English words are not known);

(E) internalize new basic and academic language by using and reusing it in meaningful ways in speaking and writing activities that build concept and language attainment;

(F) use accessible language and learn new and essential language in the process;

(G) demonstrate an increasing ability to distinguish between formal and informal English and an increasing knowledge of when to use each one commensurate with grade-level learning expectations; and

(H) develop and expand repertoire of learning strategies such as reasoning inductively or deductively, looking for patterns in language, and analyzing sayings and expressions commensurate with grade-level learning expectations.

(2) Cross-curricular second language acquisition/listening. The ELL listens to a variety of speakers including teachers, peers, and electronic media to gain an increasing level of comprehension of newly acquired language in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in listening. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:

(A) distinguish sounds and intonation patterns of English with increasing ease;

(B) recognize elements of the English sound system in newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters;

(C) learn new language structures, expressions, and basic and academic vocabulary heard during classroom instruction and interactions;

(D) monitor understanding of spoken language during classroom instruction and interactions and seek clarification as needed;

(E) use visual, contextual, and linguistic support to enhance and confirm understanding of increasingly complex and elaborated spoken language;

(F) listen to and derive meaning from a variety of media such as audio tape, video, DVD, and CD ROM to build and reinforce concept and language attainment;

(G) understand the general meaning, main points, and important details of spoken language ranging from situations in which topics, language, and contexts are familiar to unfamiliar;

(H) understand implicit ideas and information in increasingly complex spoken language commensurate with grade-level learning expectations; and

(I) demonstrate listening comprehension of increasingly complex spoken English by following directions, retelling or summarizing spoken messages, responding to questions and requests, collaborating with peers, and taking notes commensurate with content and grade-level needs.

(3) Cross-curricular second language acquisition/speaking. The ELL speaks in a variety of modes for a variety of purposes with an awareness of different language registers (formal/informal) using vocabulary with increasing fluency and accuracy in language arts and all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in speaking. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:

(A) practice producing sounds of newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters to pronounce English words in a manner that is increasingly comprehensible;

(B) expand and internalize initial English vocabulary by learning and using high-frequency English words necessary for identifying and describing people, places, and objects, by retelling simple stories and basic information represented or supported by pictures, and by learning and using routine language needed for classroom communication;

(C) speak using a variety of grammatical structures, sentence lengths, sentence types, and connecting words with increasing accuracy and ease as more English is acquired;

(D) speak using grade-level content area vocabulary in context to internalize new English words and build academic language proficiency;

(E) share information in cooperative learning interactions;

(F) ask and give information ranging from using a very limited bank of high-frequency, high-need, concrete vocabulary, including key words and expressions needed for basic communication in academic and social contexts, to using abstract and content-based vocabulary during extended speaking assignments;

(G) express opinions, ideas, and feelings ranging from communicating single words and short phrases to participating in extended discussions on a variety of social and grade-appropriate academic topics;

(H) narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail as more English is acquired;

(I) adapt spoken language appropriately for formal and informal purposes; and

(J) respond orally to information presented in a wide variety of print, electronic, audio, and visual media to build and reinforce concept and language attainment.

(4) Cross-curricular second language acquisition/reading. The ELL reads a variety of texts for a variety of purposes with an increasing level of comprehension in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in reading. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations apply to text read aloud for students not yet at the stage of decoding written text. The student is expected to:

(A) learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language and decode (sound out) words using a combination of skills such as recognizing sound-letter relationships and identifying cognates, affixes, roots, and base words;

(B) recognize directionality of English reading such as left to right and top to bottom;

(C) develop basic sight vocabulary, derive meaning of environmental print, and comprehend English vocabulary and language structures used routinely in written classroom materials;

(D) use prereading supports such as graphic organizers, illustrations, and pretaught topic-related vocabulary and other prereading activities to enhance comprehension of written text;

(E) read linguistically accommodated content area material with a decreasing need for linguistic accommodations as more English is learned;

(F) use visual and contextual support and support from peers and teachers to read grade-appropriate content area text, enhance and confirm understanding, and develop vocabulary, grasp of language structures, and background knowledge needed to comprehend increasingly challenging language;

(G) demonstrate comprehension of increasingly complex English by participating in shared reading, retelling or summarizing material, responding to questions, and taking notes commensurate with content area and grade level needs;

(H) read silently with increasing ease and comprehension for longer periods;

(I) demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing basic reading skills such as demonstrating understanding of supporting ideas and details in text and graphic sources, summarizing text, and distinguishing main ideas from details commensurate with content area needs;

(J) demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing inferential skills such as predicting, making connections between ideas, drawing inferences and conclusions from text and graphic sources, and finding supporting text evidence commensurate with content area needs; and

(K) demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing analytical skills such as evaluating written information and performing critical analyses commensurate with content area and grade-level needs.

(5) Cross-curricular second language acquisition/writing. The ELL writes in a variety of forms with increasing accuracy to effectively address a specific purpose and audience in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in writing. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations do not apply until the student has reached the stage of generating original written text using a standard writing system. The student is expected to:

(A) learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language to represent sounds when writing in English;

(B) write using newly acquired basic vocabulary and content-based grade-level vocabulary;

(C) spell familiar English words with increasing accuracy, and employ English spelling patterns and rules with increasing accuracy as more English is acquired;

(D) edit writing for standard grammar and usage, including subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement, and appropriate verb tenses commensurate with grade-level expectations as more English is acquired;

(E) employ increasingly complex grammatical structures in content area writing commensurate with grade-level expectations, such as:

(i) using correct verbs, tenses, and pronouns/antecedents;

(ii) using possessive case (apostrophe s ) correctly; and

(iii) using negatives and contractions correctly;

(F) write using a variety of grade-appropriate sentence lengths, patterns, and connecting words to combine phrases, clauses, and sentences in increasingly accurate ways as more English is acquired; and

(G) narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail to fulfill content area writing needs as more English is acquired.

(d) Proficiency level descriptors.

(1) Listening, Kindergarten-Grade 12. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in listening. The following proficiency level descriptors for listening are sufficient to describe the overall English language proficiency levels of ELLs in this language domain in order to linguistically accommodate their instruction.

(A) Beginning. Beginning ELLs have little or no ability to understand spoken English in academic and social settings. These students:

(i) struggle to understand simple conversations and simple discussions even when the topics are familiar and the speaker uses linguistic supports such as visuals, slower speech and other verbal cues, and gestures;

(ii) struggle to identify and distinguish individual words and phrases during social and instructional interactions that have not been intentionally modified for ELLs; and

(iii) may not seek clarification in English when failing to comprehend the English they hear; frequently remain silent, watching others for cues.

(B) Intermediate. Intermediate ELLs have the ability to understand simple, high-frequency spoken English used in routine academic and social settings. These students:

(i) usually understand simple or routine directions, as well as short, simple conversations and short, simple discussions on familiar topics; when topics are unfamiliar, require extensive linguistic supports and adaptations such as visuals, slower speech and other verbal cues, simplified language, gestures, and preteaching to preview or build topic-related vocabulary;

(ii) often identify and distinguish key words and phrases necessary to understand the general meaning during social and basic instructional interactions that have not been intentionally modified for ELLs; and

(iii) have the ability to seek clarification in English when failing to comprehend the English they hear by requiring/requesting the speaker to repeat, slow down, or rephrase speech.

(C) Advanced. Advanced ELLs have the ability to understand, with second language acquisition support, grade-appropriate spoken English used in academic and social settings. These students:

(i) usually understand longer, more elaborated directions, conversations, and discussions on familiar and some unfamiliar topics, but sometimes need processing time and sometimes depend on visuals, verbal cues, and gestures to support understanding;

(ii) understand most main points, most important details, and some implicit information during social and basic instructional interactions that have not been intentionally modified for ELLs; and

(iii) occasionally require/request the speaker to repeat, slow down, or rephrase to clarify the meaning of the English they hear.

(D) Advanced high. Advanced high ELLs have the ability to understand, with minimal second language acquisition support, grade-appropriate spoken English used in academic and social settings. These students:

(i) understand longer, elaborated directions, conversations, and discussions on familiar and unfamiliar topics with occasional need for processing time and with little dependence on visuals, verbal cues, and gestures; some exceptions when complex academic or highly specialized language is used;

(ii) understand main points, important details, and implicit information at a level nearly comparable to native English-speaking peers during social and instructional interactions; and

(iii) rarely require/request the speaker to repeat, slow down, or rephrase to clarify the meaning of the English they hear.

(2) Speaking, Kindergarten-Grade 12. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in speaking. The following proficiency level descriptors for speaking are sufficient to describe the overall English language proficiency levels of ELLs in this language domain in order to linguistically accommodate their instruction.

(A) Beginning. Beginning ELLs have little or no ability to speak English in academic and social settings. These students:

(i) mainly speak using single words and short phrases consisting of recently practiced, memorized, or highly familiar material to get immediate needs met; may be hesitant to speak and often give up in their attempts to communicate;

(ii) speak using a very limited bank of high-frequency, high-need, concrete vocabulary, including key words and expressions needed for basic communication in academic and social contexts;

(iii) lack the knowledge of English grammar necessary to connect ideas and speak in sentences; can sometimes produce sentences using recently practiced, memorized, or highly familiar material;

(iv) exhibit second language acquisition errors that may hinder overall communication, particularly when trying to convey information beyond memorized, practiced, or highly familiar material; and

(v) typically use pronunciation that significantly inhibits communication.

(B) Intermediate. Intermediate ELLs have the ability to speak in a simple manner using English commonly heard in routine academic and social settings. These students:

(i) are able to express simple, original messages, speak using sentences, and participate in short conversations and classroom interactions; may hesitate frequently and for long periods to think about how to communicate desired meaning;

(ii) speak simply using basic vocabulary needed in everyday social interactions and routine academic contexts; rarely have vocabulary to speak in detail;

(iii) exhibit an emerging awareness of English grammar and speak using mostly simple sentence structures and simple tenses; are most comfortable speaking in present tense;

(iv) exhibit second language acquisition errors that may hinder overall communication when trying to use complex or less familiar English; and

(v) use pronunciation that can usually be understood by people accustomed to interacting with ELLs.

(C) Advanced. Advanced ELLs have the ability to speak using grade-appropriate English, with second language acquisition support, in academic and social settings. These students:

(i) are able to participate comfortably in most conversations and academic discussions on familiar topics, with some pauses to restate, repeat, or search for words and phrases to clarify meaning;

(ii) discuss familiar academic topics using content-based terms and common abstract vocabulary; can usually speak in some detail on familiar topics;

(iii) have a grasp of basic grammar features, including a basic ability to narrate and describe in present, past, and future tenses; have an emerging ability to use complex sentences and complex grammar features;

(iv) make errors that interfere somewhat with communication when using complex grammar structures, long sentences, and less familiar words and expressions; and

(v) may mispronounce words, but use pronunciation that can usually be understood by people not accustomed to interacting with ELLs.

(D) Advanced high. Advanced high ELLs have the ability to speak using grade-appropriate English, with minimal second language acquisition support, in academic and social settings. These students:

(i) are able to participate in extended discussions on a variety of social and grade-appropriate academic topics with only occasional disruptions, hesitations, or pauses;

(ii) communicate effectively using abstract and content-based vocabulary during classroom instructional tasks, with some exceptions when low-frequency or academically demanding vocabulary is needed; use many of the same idioms and colloquialisms as their native English-speaking peers;

(iii) can use English grammar structures and complex sentences to narrate and describe at a level nearly comparable to native English-speaking peers;

(iv) make few second language acquisition errors that interfere with overall communication; and

(v) may mispronounce words, but rarely use pronunciation that interferes with overall communication.

(3) Reading, Kindergarten-Grade 1. ELLs in Kindergarten and Grade 1 may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in reading. The following proficiency level descriptors for reading are sufficient to describe the overall English language proficiency levels of ELLs in this language domain in order to linguistically accommodate their instruction and should take into account developmental stages of emergent readers.

(A) Beginning. Beginning ELLs have little or no ability to use the English language to build foundational reading skills. These students:

(i) derive little or no meaning from grade-appropriate stories read aloud in English, unless the stories are:

(I) read in short "chunks;"

(II) controlled to include the little English they know such as language that is high frequency, concrete, and recently practiced; and

(III) accompanied by ample visual supports such as illustrations, gestures, pantomime, and objects and by linguistic supports such as careful enunciation and slower speech;

(ii) begin to recognize and understand environmental print in English such as signs, labeled items, names of peers, and logos; and

(iii) have difficulty decoding most grade-appropriate English text because they:

(I) understand the meaning of very few words in English; and

(II) struggle significantly with sounds in spoken English words and with sound-symbol relationships due to differences between their primary language and English.

(B) Intermediate. Intermediate ELLs have a limited ability to use the English language to build foundational reading skills. These students:

(i) demonstrate limited comprehension (key words and general meaning) of grade-appropriate stories read aloud in English, unless the stories include:

(I) predictable story lines;

(II) highly familiar topics;

(III) primarily high-frequency, concrete vocabulary;

(IV) short, simple sentences; and

(V) visual and linguistic supports;

(ii) regularly recognize and understand common environmental print in English such as signs, labeled items, names of peers, logos; and

(iii) have difficulty decoding grade-appropriate English text because they:

(I) understand the meaning of only those English words they hear frequently; and

(II) struggle with some sounds in English words and some sound-symbol relationships due to differences between their primary language and English.

(C) Advanced. Advanced ELLs have the ability to use the English language, with second language acquisition support, to build foundational reading skills. These students:

(i) demonstrate comprehension of most main points and most supporting ideas in grade-appropriate stories read aloud in English, although they may still depend on visual and linguistic supports to gain or confirm meaning;

(ii) recognize some basic English vocabulary and high-frequency words in isolated print; and

(iii) with second language acquisition support, are able to decode most grade-appropriate English text because they:

(I) understand the meaning of most grade-appropriate English words; and

(II) have little difficulty with English sounds and sound-symbol relationships that result from differences between their primary language and English.

(D) Advanced high. Advanced high ELLs have the ability to use the English language, with minimal second language acquisition support, to build foundational reading skills. These students:

(i) demonstrate, with minimal second language acquisition support and at a level nearly comparable to native English-speaking peers, comprehension of main points and supporting ideas (explicit and implicit) in grade-appropriate stories read aloud in English;

(ii) with some exceptions, recognize sight vocabulary and high-frequency words to a degree nearly comparable to that of native English-speaking peers; and

(iii) with minimal second language acquisition support, have an ability to decode and understand grade-appropriate English text at a level nearly comparable to native English-speaking peers.

(4) Reading, Grades 2-12. ELLs in Grades 2-12 may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in reading. The following proficiency level descriptors for reading are sufficient to describe the overall English language proficiency levels of ELLs in this language domain in order to linguistically accommodate their instruction.

(A) Beginning. Beginning ELLs have little or no ability to read and understand English used in academic and social contexts. These students:

(i) read and understand the very limited recently practiced, memorized, or highly familiar English they have learned; vocabulary predominantly includes:

(I) environmental print;

(II) some very high-frequency words; and

(III) concrete words that can be represented by pictures;

(ii) read slowly, word by word;

(iii) have a very limited sense of English language structures;

(iv) comprehend predominantly isolated familiar words and phrases; comprehend some sentences in highly routine contexts or recently practiced, highly familiar text;

(v) are highly dependent on visuals and prior knowledge to derive meaning from text in English; and

(vi) are able to apply reading comprehension skills in English only when reading texts written for this level.

(B) Intermediate. Intermediate ELLs have the ability to read and understand simple, high-frequency English used in routine academic and social contexts. These students:

(i) read and understand English vocabulary on a somewhat wider range of topics and with increased depth; vocabulary predominantly includes:

(I) everyday oral language;

(II) literal meanings of common words;

(III) routine academic language and terms; and

(IV) commonly used abstract language such as terms used to describe basic feelings;

(ii) often read slowly and in short phrases; may re-read to clarify meaning;

(iii) have a growing understanding of basic, routinely used English language structures;

(iv) understand simple sentences in short, connected texts, but are dependent on visual cues, topic familiarity, prior knowledge, pretaught topic-related vocabulary, story predictability, and teacher/peer assistance to sustain comprehension;

(v) struggle to independently read and understand grade-level texts; and

(vi) are able to apply basic and some higher-order comprehension skills when reading texts that are linguistically accommodated and/or simplified for this level.

(C) Advanced. Advanced ELLs have the ability to read and understand, with second language acquisition support, grade-appropriate English used in academic and social contexts. These students:

(i) read and understand, with second language acquisition support, a variety of grade-appropriate English vocabulary used in social and academic contexts:

(I) with second language acquisition support, read and understand grade-appropriate concrete and abstract vocabulary, but have difficulty with less commonly encountered words;

(II) demonstrate an emerging ability to understand words and phrases beyond their literal meaning; and

(III) understand multiple meanings of commonly used words;

(ii) read longer phrases and simple sentences from familiar text with appropriate rate and speed;

(iii) are developing skill in using their growing familiarity with English language structures to construct meaning of grade-appropriate text; and

(iv) are able to apply basic and higher-order comprehension skills when reading grade-appropriate text, but are still occasionally dependent on visuals, teacher/peer assistance, and other linguistically accommodated text features to determine or clarify meaning, particularly with unfamiliar topics.

(D) Advanced high. Advanced high ELLs have the ability to read and understand, with minimal second language acquisition support, grade-appropriate English used in academic and social contexts. These students:

(i) read and understand vocabulary at a level nearly comparable to that of their native English-speaking peers, with some exceptions when low-frequency or specialized vocabulary is used;

(ii) generally read grade-appropriate, familiar text with appropriate rate, speed, intonation, and expression;

(iii) are able to, at a level nearly comparable to native English-speaking peers, use their familiarity with English language structures to construct meaning of grade-appropriate text; and

(iv) are able to apply, with minimal second language acquisition support and at a level nearly comparable to native English-speaking peers, basic and higher-order comprehension skills when reading grade-appropriate text.

(5) Writing, Kindergarten-Grade 1. ELLs in Kindergarten and Grade 1 may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in writing. The following proficiency level descriptors for writing are sufficient to describe the overall English language proficiency levels of ELLs in this language domain in order to linguistically accommodate their instruction and should take into account developmental stages of emergent writers.

(A) Beginning. Beginning ELLs have little or no ability to use the English language to build foundational writing skills. These students:

(i) are unable to use English to explain self-generated writing such as stories they have created or other personal expressions, including emergent forms of writing (pictures, letter-like forms, mock words, scribbling, etc.);

(ii) know too little English to participate meaningfully in grade-appropriate shared writing activities using the English language;

(iii) cannot express themselves meaningfully in self-generated, connected written text in English beyond the level of high-frequency, concrete words, phrases, or short sentences that have been recently practiced and/or memorized; and

(iv) may demonstrate little or no awareness of English print conventions.

(B) Intermediate. Intermediate ELLs have a limited ability to use the English language to build foundational writing skills. These students:

(i) know enough English to explain briefly and simply self-generated writing, including emergent forms of writing, as long as the topic is highly familiar and concrete and requires very high-frequency English;

(ii) can participate meaningfully in grade-appropriate shared writing activities using the English language only when the writing topic is highly familiar and concrete and requires very high-frequency English;

(iii) express themselves meaningfully in self-generated, connected written text in English when their writing is limited to short sentences featuring simple, concrete English used frequently in class; and

(iv) frequently exhibit features of their primary language when writing in English such as primary language words, spelling patterns, word order, and literal translating.

(C) Advanced. Advanced ELLs have the ability to use the English language to build, with second language acquisition support, foundational writing skills. These students:

(i) use predominantly grade-appropriate English to explain, in some detail, most self-generated writing, including emergent forms of writing;

(ii) can participate meaningfully, with second language acquisition support, in most grade-appropriate shared writing activities using the English language;

(iii) although second language acquisition support is needed, have an emerging ability to express themselves in self-generated, connected written text in English in a grade-appropriate manner; and

(iv) occasionally exhibit second language acquisition errors when writing in English.

(D) Advanced high. Advanced high ELLs have the ability to use the English language to build, with minimal second language acquisition support, foundational writing skills. These students:

(i) use English at a level of complexity and detail nearly comparable to that of native English-speaking peers when explaining self-generated writing, including emergent forms of writing;

(ii) can participate meaningfully in most grade-appropriate shared writing activities using the English language; and

(iii) although minimal second language acquisition support may be needed, express themselves in self-generated, connected written text in English in a manner nearly comparable to their native English-speaking peers.

(6) Writing, Grades 2-12. ELLs in Grades 2-12 may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in writing. The following proficiency level descriptors for writing are sufficient to describe the overall English language proficiency levels of ELLs in this language domain in order to linguistically accommodate their instruction.

(A) Beginning. Beginning ELLs lack the English vocabulary and grasp of English language structures necessary to address grade-appropriate writing tasks meaningfully. These students:

(i) have little or no ability to use the English language to express ideas in writing and engage meaningfully in grade-appropriate writing assignments in content area instruction;

(ii) lack the English necessary to develop or demonstrate elements of grade-appropriate writing such as focus and coherence, conventions, organization, voice, and development of ideas in English; and

(iii) exhibit writing features typical at this level, including:

(I) ability to label, list, and copy;

(II) high-frequency words/phrases and short, simple sentences (or even short paragraphs) based primarily on recently practiced, memorized, or highly familiar material; this type of writing may be quite accurate;

(III) present tense used primarily; and

(IV) frequent primary language features (spelling patterns, word order, literal translations, and words from the student's primary language) and other errors associated with second language acquisition may significantly hinder or prevent understanding, even for individuals accustomed to the writing of ELLs.

(B) Intermediate. Intermediate ELLs have enough English vocabulary and enough grasp of English language structures to address grade-appropriate writing tasks in a limited way. These students:

(i) have a limited ability to use the English language to express ideas in writing and engage meaningfully in grade-appropriate writing assignments in content area instruction;

(ii) are limited in their ability to develop or demonstrate elements of grade-appropriate writing in English; communicate best when topics are highly familiar and concrete, and require simple, high-frequency English; and

(iii) exhibit writing features typical at this level, including:

(I) simple, original messages consisting of short, simple sentences; frequent inaccuracies occur when creating or taking risks beyond familiar English;

(II) high-frequency vocabulary; academic writing often has an oral tone;

(III) loosely connected text with limited use of cohesive devices or repetitive use, which may cause gaps in meaning;

(IV) repetition of ideas due to lack of vocabulary and language structures;

(V) present tense used most accurately; simple future and past tenses, if attempted, are used inconsistently or with frequent inaccuracies;

(VI) undetailed descriptions, explanations, and narrations; difficulty expressing abstract ideas;

(VII) primary language features and errors associated with second language acquisition may be frequent; and

(VIII) some writing may be understood only by individuals accustomed to the writing of ELLs; parts of the writing may be hard to understand even for individuals accustomed to ELL writing.

(C) Advanced. Advanced ELLs have enough English vocabulary and command of English language structures to address grade-appropriate writing tasks, although second language acquisition support is needed. These students:

(i) are able to use the English language, with second language acquisition support, to express ideas in writing and engage meaningfully in grade-appropriate writing assignments in content area instruction;

(ii) know enough English to be able to develop or demonstrate elements of grade-appropriate writing in English, although second language acquisition support is particularly needed when topics are abstract, academically challenging, or unfamiliar; and

(iii) exhibit writing features typical at this level, including:

(I) grasp of basic verbs, tenses, grammar features, and sentence patterns; partial grasp of more complex verbs, tenses, grammar features, and sentence patterns;

(II) emerging grade-appropriate vocabulary; academic writing has a more academic tone;

(III) use of a variety of common cohesive devices, although some redundancy may occur;

(IV) narrations, explanations, and descriptions developed in some detail with emerging clarity; quality or quantity declines when abstract ideas are expressed, academic demands are high, or low-frequency vocabulary is required;

(V) occasional second language acquisition errors; and

(VI) communications are usually understood by individuals not accustomed to the writing of ELLs.

(D) Advanced high. Advanced high ELLs have acquired the English vocabulary and command of English language structures necessary to address grade-appropriate writing tasks with minimal second language acquisition support. These students:

(i) are able to use the English language, with minimal second language acquisition support, to express ideas in writing and engage meaningfully in grade-appropriate writing assignments in content area instruction;

(ii) know enough English to be able to develop or demonstrate, with minimal second language acquisition support, elements of grade-appropriate writing in English; and

(iii) exhibit writing features typical at this level, including:

(I) nearly comparable to writing of native English-speaking peers in clarity and precision with regard to English vocabulary and language structures, with occasional exceptions when writing about academically complex ideas, abstract ideas, or topics requiring low-frequency vocabulary;

(II) occasional difficulty with naturalness of phrasing and expression; and

(III) errors associated with second language acquisition are minor and usually limited to low-frequency words and structures; errors rarely interfere with communication.

(e) Effective date. The provisions of this section supersede the ESL standards specified in Chapter 128 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Spanish Language Arts and English as a Second Language) upon the effective date of this section.

Subchapter B

§74.11: High School Graduation Requirements

(a) Graduates of each high school are awarded the same type of diploma. The academic achievement record (transcript), rather than the diploma, records individual accomplishments, achievements, and courses completed and displays appropriate graduation seals.

(b) All credit for graduation must be earned no later than Grade 12.

(c) To receive a high school diploma, a student entering Grade 9 in the 1998-1999, 1999-2000, or 2000-2001 school years must complete the requirements of the minimum high school program, as specified in subsection (d) of this section; the recommended high school program, as specified in §74.12 of this title (relating to Recommended High School Program); or the distinguished achievement program, as specified in §74.13 of this title (relating to Distinguished Achievement Program--Advanced High School Program); as well as the testing requirements for graduation, as specified in Chapter 101 of this title (relating to Assessment).

(d) A student must earn at least 22 credits to complete a minimum high school program. Credit may be awarded without prior instruction under Texas Education Code, §28.023 (Credit by Examination). College Board advanced placement and International Baccalaureate courses may be substituted for requirements in appropriate areas. A student must demonstrate proficiency in the following.

(1) English language arts--four credits. The credits must consist of:

(A) English I, II, and III (English I for Speakers of Other Languages and English II for Speakers of Other Languages may be substituted for English I and II only for immigrant students with limited English proficiency); and

(B) a fourth credit of English, which may be satisfied by English IV, Research/Technical Writing, Creative/Imaginative Writing, Practical Writing Skills, Literary Genres, Business Communication, Journalism, or concurrent enrollment in a college English course.

(2) Mathematics--three credits to include Algebra I.

(3) Science--two credits to include at least one credit from Biology, Chemistry, or Physics. The second credit may be selected from any science course approved by the State Board of Education (SBOE).

(4) Social studies--two and one-half credits. The credits must consist of World History Studies (one credit) or World Geography Studies (one credit), United States History Studies Since Reconstruction (one credit), and United States Government (one-half credit).

(5) Academic elective--one credit. The credit must be selected from World History Studies, World Geography Studies, or any course approved by the SBOE for science credit as found in Chapter 112 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Science).

(6) Economics, with emphasis on the free enterprise system and its benefits--one-half credit. The credit must consist of Economics with Emphasis on the Free Enterprise System and Its Benefits.

(7) Physical education--one and one-half credits to include one-half credit in Foundations of Personal Fitness.

(A) The school district board of trustees may allow a student to substitute certain physical activities for the one and one-half required credits of physical education, including the one-half credit of Foundations of Personal Fitness. The substitutions must be based on the physical activity involved in drill team, marching band, and cheerleading during the fall semester; Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC); athletics; Dance I-IV; and two- or three-credit career and technology work-based training courses.

(B) A student may not earn more than two credits in physical education toward state graduation requirements.

(C) In accordance with local district policy, a school district may award up to two credits for physical education for appropriate private or commercially-sponsored physical activity programs conducted on or off campus. The district must apply to the commissioner of education for approval of such programs, which may be substituted for state graduation credit in physical education. Such approval may be granted under the following conditions.

(i) Olympic-level participation and/or competition includes a minimum of 15 hours per week of highly intensive, professional, supervised training. The training facility, instructors, and the activities involved in the program must be certified by the superintendent to be of exceptional quality. Students qualifying and participating at this level may be dismissed from school one hour per day. Students dismissed may not miss any class other than physical education.

(ii) Private or commercially-sponsored physical activities include those certified by the superintendent to be of high quality and well supervised by appropriately trained instructors. Student participation of at least five hours per week must be required. Students certified to participate at this level may not be dismissed from any part of the regular school day.

(8) Health education--one-half credit of Health 1 or Advanced Health, or Health Science Technology--one credit.

(9) Speech--one-half credit, which may be satisfied by Communication Applications, Speech Communication, Public Speaking, Debate, or Oral Interpretation.

(10) Technology applications--one credit, which may be satisfied by:

(A) the following courses in Chapter 126 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Applications): Computer Science I, Computer Science II, Desktop Publishing, Digital Graphics/Animation, Multimedia, Video Technology, Web Mastering, or Independent Study in Technology Applications;

(B) the following courses in Chapter 120 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Business Education): Business Computer Information Systems I or II, Business Computer Programming, Telecommunications and Networking, or Business Image Management and Multimedia; or

(C) the following courses in Chapter 123 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Education/Industrial Technology Education): Computer Applications, Technology Systems (modular computer laboratory-based), Communication Graphics (modular computer laboratory-based), or Computer Multimedia and Animation Technology.

(11) Electives--five and one-half credits. The credits must be selected from:

(A) the list of courses approved by the SBOE for Grades 9-12 as specified in §74.1 of this title (relating to Essential Knowledge and Skills);

(B) Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) (one to four credits); or

(C) Driver Education (one-half credit).

(e) A maximum of three credits of reading may be offered by districts for state graduation elective credit for identified students under the following conditions. The school district board of trustees shall adopt policies to identify students in need of additional reading instruction, and district procedures shall include assessment of individual student needs, ongoing evaluation of each student's progress, and monitoring of instructional activities to ensure that student needs are addressed. Reading credits may be selected from Reading I, II, or III.

(f) An out-of-state or out-of-country transfer student (including foreign exchange students) or a transfer student from a Texas nonpublic school is eligible to receive a Texas diploma but must complete all requirements of this section to satisfy state graduation requirements. Any course credit required in this section that is not completed by the student before he or she enrolls in a Texas school district may be satisfied through the provisions of §74.23 of this title (relating to Correspondence Courses) and §74.24 of this title (relating to Credit by Examination) or by completing the course or courses according to the provisions of §74.26 of this title (relating to the Award of Credit).

(g) The requirements for high school graduation for students who enrolled in a high school program during or before the 1997-1998 school year shall remain in effect as adopted by the State Board of Education.

(h) Students entering Grade 9 in the 2001-2002 school year and thereafter must complete requirements in Chapter 74, Subchapter D, of this title (relating to Curriculum Requirements).

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.11 adopted to be effective September 1, 1996, 21 TexReg 4311; amended to be effective October 13, 1997, 22 TexReg 10129; amended to be effective September 1, 1998, 23 TexReg 5675; amended to be effective September 1, 2001, 25 TexReg 7691

§74.12: Recommended High School Program

(a) General requirements. A student entering Grade 9 in the 1998-1999, 1999-2000, or 2000-2001 school years who wishes to complete the recommended high school program and have the accomplishment recognized on the academic achievement record must complete the following requirements.

(b) Academic core components. College Board advanced placement and International Baccalaureate courses may be substituted for requirements in appropriate areas. Credit may be awarded without prior instruction under Texas Education Code, §28.023 (Credit by Examination). The student must demonstrate proficiency in the following.

(1) English--four credits. The credits must consist of English I, English II, English III, and English IV (English I for Speakers of Other Languages and English II for Speakers of Other Languages may be substituted for English I and II only for immigrant students with limited English proficiency).

(2) Mathematics--three credits. The credits must consist of Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry.

(3) Science--three credits. Students may choose three credits from the following four areas. Not more than one credit may be chosen from each of the four areas. All students who wish to complete the recommended high school program are encouraged to take Biology, Chemistry, and Physics to fulfill the requirements of this section.

(A) Integrated Physics and Chemistry;

(B) Biology, AP Biology, or IB Biology;

(C) Chemistry, AP Chemistry, or IB Chemistry; and

(D) Physics, Principles of Technology I, AP Physics, or IB Physics.

(4) Social studies--three and one-half credits. The credits must consist of World History Studies (one credit), World Geography Studies (one credit), United States History Studies Since Reconstruction (one credit), and United States Government (one-half credit).

(5) Economics, with emphasis on the free enterprise system and its benefits--one-half credit. The credit must consist of Economics with Emphasis on the Free Enterprise System and Its Benefits.

(6) Languages other than English--two credits. The credits must consist of Level I and Level II in the same language.

(7) Health education--one-half credit of Health 1 or Advanced Health, or Health Science Technology--one credit.

(8) Fine arts--one credit, which may be satisfied by any course in Chapter 117, Subchapter C, of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Fine Arts).

(9) Physical education--one and one-half credits to include one-half credit in Foundations of Personal Fitness.

(A) A school district board of trustees may allow a student to substitute certain physical activities for the one and one-half required credits of physical education, including the one-half credit of Foundations of Personal Fitness. The substitutions must be based on the physical activity involved in drill team, marching band, and cheerleading during the fall semester; Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC); athletics; Dance I-IV; and two- or three-credit career and technology work-based training courses.

(B) In accordance with local district policy, a school district may also apply to the commissioner of education for a waiver to allow credit for appropriate private or commercially-sponsored physical activity programs conducted on or off campus. Such approval may be granted under the following conditions.

(i) Olympic-level participation and/or competition includes a minimum of 15 hours per week of highly intensive, professional, supervised training. The training facility, instructors, and the activities involved in the program must be certified by the superintendent to be of exceptional quality. Students qualifying and participating at this level may be dismissed from school one hour per day. Students dismissed may not miss any class other than physical education.

(ii) Private or commercially-sponsored physical activities include those certified by the superintendent to be of high quality and well supervised by appropriately trained instructors. Student participation of at least five hours per week must be required. Students certified to participate at this level may not be dismissed from any part of the regular school day.

(10) Technology applications--one credit, which may be satisfied by:

(A) the following courses in Chapter 126 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Applications): Computer Science I, Computer Science II, Desktop Publishing, Digital Graphics/Animation, Multimedia, Video Technology, Web Mastering, or Independent Study in Technology Applications;

(B) the following courses in Chapter 120 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Business Education): Business Computer Information Systems I or II, Business Computer Programming, Telecommunications and Networking, or Business Image Management and Multimedia; or

(C) the following courses in Chapter 123 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Education/Industrial Technology Education): Computer Applications, Technology Systems (modular computer laboratory-based), Communication Graphics (modular computer laboratory-based), or Computer Multimedia and Animation Technology.

(11) Speech--one-half credit, which may be satisfied by Communication Applications, Speech Communication, Public Speaking, Debate, or Oral Interpretation.

(c) Additional components. All students who wish to complete the recommended high school program are encouraged to study each of the foundation curriculum areas (English language arts, mathematics, science and social studies) every year in high school as provided in Option I. Options II and III are provided for students who want to focus on a particular career exploration or the development of an academic interest or artistic talent. College Board advanced placement and International Baccalaureate courses may be substituted for requirements in appropriate areas. The student must choose one of the following options for additional components. Credit may be awarded without prior instruction under Texas Education Code, §28.023 (Credit by Examination), or §39.023(i) (end-of-course tests).

(1) Option I: mathematics, science, elective. The student must demonstrate proficiency in the following.

(A) Mathematics--one credit. The credit must consist of Precalculus.

(B) Science--one credit. Students may select any Science course including Integrated Physics and Chemistry; Biology; Environmental Systems; Chemistry; Aquatic Science; Physics; Astronomy; Geology, Meteorology, and Oceanography; AP Biology; AP Chemistry; AP Physics; AP Environmental Science; IB Biology; IB Chemistry; IB Physics; IB Environmental Systems; Scientific Research and Design; Anatomy and Physiology of Human Systems; Medical Microbiology; Pathophysiology; Principles of Technology I; and Principles of Technology II.

(C) Elective--one and one-half credits.

(2) Option II: career and technology. The student must demonstrate proficiency equivalent to three and one-half credits in a coherent sequence of courses for career and technology preparation, as defined by the local school district. To be included in the recommended high school program, a technology preparation program approved by the Texas Education Agency must meet recommended high school program criteria in English language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, languages other than English, health, fine arts, and technology applications.

(3) Option III: academic. The student must demonstrate proficiency equivalent to three and one-half credits consisting of state-approved courses from language arts, science, social studies, mathematics, languages other than English, fine arts, or technology applications. Students may choose all three and one-half credits from one of the disciplines, or they may select courses among the listed disciplines.

(d) Substitutions. No substitutions are allowed in the Recommended High School Program.

(e) Students entering Grade 9 in the 2001-2002 school year and thereafter must complete requirements in Chapter 74, Subchapter D, of this title (relating to Curriculum Requirements).

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.12 adopted to be effective September 1, 1996, 21 TexReg 4311; amended to be effective October 13, 1997, 22 TexReg 10129; amended to be effective September 1, 1998, 23 TexReg 5675; amended to be effective September 1, 2001, 25 TexReg 7691

§74.13: Distinguished Achievement Program--Advanced High School Program

(a) General requirements. A student entering Grade 9 in the 1998-1999, 1999-2000, or 2000-2001 school years who wishes to complete an advanced high school program (called the distinguished achievement program) and have the accomplishment recognized and distinguished on the academic achievement record (transcript) must complete the following requirements.

(1) Academic core components. College Board advanced placement and International Baccalaureate courses may be substituted for requirements in appropriate areas. The student must demonstrate proficiency in the following.

(A) English--four credits. The credits must consist of English I, English II, English III, and English IV (English I for Speakers of Other Languages and English II for Speakers of Other Languages may be substituted for English I and II only for immigrant students with limited English proficiency);

(B) Mathematics--three credits. The credits must consist of Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry.

(C) Science--three credits. Students may choose three credits from the following four areas. Not more than one credit may be chosen from each of the four areas. All students who wish to complete the distinguished achievement program are encouraged to take Biology, Chemistry, and Physics to fulfill the requirements of this section.

(i) Integrated Physics and Chemistry;

(ii) Biology, AP Biology, or IB Biology;

(iii) Chemistry, AP Chemistry, or IB Chemistry; and

(iv) Physics, Principles of Technology I, AP Physics, or IB Physics.

(D) Social studies--three and one-half credits. The credits must consist of World History Studies (one credit), World Geography Studies (one credit), United States History Studies Since Reconstruction (one credit), and United States Government (one-half credit).

(E) Economics, with emphasis on the free enterprise system and its benefits--one-half credit. The credit must consist of Economics with Emphasis on the Free Enterprise System and Its Benefits.

(F) Languages other than English--three credits. The credits must consist of Level I, Level II, and Level III in the same language.

(G) Health education--one-half credit of Health 1 or Advanced Health, or Health Science Technology--one credit.

(H) Fine arts--one credit, which may be satisfied by any course in Chapter 117, Subchapter C, of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Fine Arts).

(I) Physical education--one and one-half credits to include one-half credit in Foundations of Personal Fitness.

(i) A school district board of trustees may allow a student to substitute certain physical activities for the one and one-half required credits of physical education, including the one-half credit of Foundations of Personal Fitness. The substitutions must be based on the physical activity involved in drill team, marching band, and cheerleading during the fall semester; Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC); athletics; Dance I-IV; and two- or three-credit career and technology work-based training courses.

(ii) In accordance with local district policy, a school district may also apply to the commissioner of education for a waiver to allow credit for appropriate private or commercially-sponsored physical activity programs conducted on or off campus. Such approval may be granted under the following conditions.

(I) Olympic-level participation and/or competition includes a minimum of 15 hours per week of highly intensive, professional, supervised training. The training facility, instructors, and the activities involved in the program must be certified by the superintendent to be of exceptional quality. Students qualifying and participating at this level may be dismissed from school one hour per day. Students dismissed may not miss any class other than physical education.

(II) Private or commercially-sponsored physical activities include those certified by the superintendent to be of high quality and well supervised by appropriately trained instructors. Student participation of at least five hours per week must be required. Students certified to participate at this level may not be dismissed from any part of the regular school day.

(J) Technology applications--one credit, which may be satisfied by:

(i) the following courses in Chapter 126 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Applications): Computer Science I, Computer Science II, Desktop Publishing, Digital Graphics/Animation, Multimedia, Video Technology, Web Mastering, or Independent Study in Technology Applications;

(ii) the following courses in Chapter 120 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Business Education): Business Computer Information Systems I or II, Business Computer Programming, Telecommunications and Networking, or Business Image Management and Multimedia; or

(iii) the following courses in Chapter 123 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Education/Industrial Technology Education): Computer Applications, Technology Systems (modular computer laboratory-based), Communication Graphics (modular computer laboratory-based), or Computer Multimedia and Animation Technology.

(K) Speech--one-half credit, which may be satisfied by Communication Applications, Speech Communication, Public Speaking, Debate, or Oral Interpretation.

(2) Additional components. All students who wish to complete the distinguished achievement program are encouraged to study each of the foundation curriculum areas (English language arts, mathematics, science and social studies) every year in high school as provided in Option I. Options II and III are provided for students who want to focus on a particular career exploration or the development of an academic interest or artistic talent. College Board advanced placement and International Baccalaureate courses may be substituted for requirements in appropriate academic areas. The student must choose one of the following options for additional components. Credit may be awarded without prior instruction under Texas Education Code, §28.023, (Credit by Examination).

(A) Option I: mathematics, science, elective. The student must demonstrate proficiency in the following.

(i) Mathematics--one credit. The credit must consist of Precalculus.

(ii) Science--one credit. Students may select any Science course including Integrated Physics and Chemistry; Biology; Environmental Systems; Chemistry; Aquatic Science; Physics; Astronomy; Geology, Meteorology, and Oceanography; AP Biology; AP Chemistry; AP Physics; AP Environmental Science; IB Biology; IB Chemistry; IB Physics; IB Environmental Systems; Scientific Research and Design; Anatomy and Physiology of Human Systems; Medical Microbiology; Pathophysiology; Principles of Technology I; and Principles of Technology II.

(iii) Elective--one-half credit.

(B) Option II: career and technology. The student must demonstrate proficiency equivalent to two and one-half credits in a coherent sequence of courses for career and technology preparation, as defined by the local school district. To be included in the distinguished achievement program, a technology preparation program approved by the Texas Education Agency (TEA) must meet distinguished achievement program criteria in English language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, languages other than English, health, fine arts, and technology applications.

(C) Option III: academic. The student must demonstrate proficiency equivalent to two and one-half credits consisting of state-approved courses from language arts, science, social studies, mathematics, languages other than English, fine arts, or technology applications. Students may choose all two and one-half credits from one of the disciplines, or they may select courses among the listed disciplines.

(3) Advanced measures. A student also must achieve any combination of four of the following advanced measures. Original research/projects may not be used for more than two of the four advanced measures. The measures must focus on demonstrated student performance at the college or professional level. Student performance on advanced measures must be assessed through an external review process.

(A) original research/project that is:

(i) judged by a panel of professionals in the field that is the focus of the project; or

(ii) conducted under the direction of mentor(s) and reported to an appropriate audience; and

(iii) related to the required curriculum set forth in §74.1 of this title (relating to Essential Knowledge and Skills);

(B) test data where a student receives:

(i) a score of three or above on The College Board advanced placement examination;

(ii) a score of four or above on an International Baccalaureate examination; or

(iii) a score on the Preliminary Scholastic Assessment Test (PSAT) that qualifies a student for recognition as a Commended Scholar or higher by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation; as part of the National Hispanic Scholar Program of the College Board; or as part of the National Achievement Scholarship Program for Outstanding Negro Students of the National Merit Scholarship Corporation. The PSAT score may count as only one advanced measure regardless of the number of honors received by the student; or

(C) college academic courses and tech-prep articulated college courses with a grade of 3.0 or higher.

(4) Substitutions. No substitutions are allowed in the Distinguished Achievement Program.

(b) Students entering Grade 9 in the 2001-2002 school year and thereafter must complete requirements in Chapter 74, Subchapter D, of this title (relating to Curriculum Requirements).

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.13 adopted to be effective September 1, 1996, 21 TexReg 4311; amended to be effective October 13, 1997, 22 TexReg 10129; amended to be effective September 1, 1998, 23 TexReg 5675; amended to be effective September 1, 2001, 25 TexReg 7691

§74.14: Academic Achievement Record (Transcript)

(a) The commissioner of education shall develop and distribute to each school district and institution of higher education in the state a common academic achievement record and coding system for courses and instructions for recording information on the academic achievement record. Each school district must use the coding system provided by the commissioner.

(b) Each school district must use an academic achievement record (transcript) form designated by the State Board of Education (SBOE). Each district must reproduce the form in sufficient quantities. The form shall serve as the academic record for each student and must be maintained permanently by the district. Each district must ensure that copies of the record are made available for a student transferring from one district to another. The information may be provided to the student or to the district to which the student is transferring or both. To ensure appropriate placement of a transfer student, a district must respond promptly to each request for student records from a receiving school district.

(c) Any credit earned by a student must be recorded on the academic achievement record, regardless of when the credit was earned.

(d) A student who completes high school graduation requirements shall have attached to the academic achievement record a seal approved by the SBOE.

(e) A student who completes all graduation requirements except for required exit-level assessment instruments may be issued a certificate of coursework completion. The academic achievement record will include a notation of the date such a certificate was issued to the student.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.14 adopted to be effective September 1, 1996, 21 TexReg 4311; amended to be effective September 1, 2001, 25 TexReg 7691

Subchapter C

§74.21: Schedule for Implementation

The requirements in this chapter shall be implemented according to the following schedule.

(1) Elementary, kindergarten through Grade 5. All provisions of §74.2 of this title (relating to Description of a Required Elementary Curriculum) shall be implemented fully beginning with the 1996-1997 school year.

(2) Secondary, Grades 6-12. All provisions of §74.3(b) of this title (relating to Description of a Required Secondary Curriculum) and Subchapter B of this chapter (relating to Graduation Requirements) shall be implemented fully beginning with the 1997-1998 school year. A student entering Grade 9 in the 1997-1998 school year or thereafter must meet the provisions of Subchapter B of this chapter (relating to Graduation Requirements).

(3) Other sections. Provisions of other sections of this chapter shall be implemented during the 1996-1997 school year unless otherwise specified.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.21 adopted to be effective September 1, 1996, 21 TexReg 4311.

§74.22: Options for Offering Courses

(a) A school district may use alternative procedures for delivering instruction to ensure that essential knowledge and skills are taught. The district shall pay any fees or other costs for students to participate in alternative delivery procedures.

(b) A school district may operate a magnet program, academy, or other innovative program to serve student populations with specialized interests and aptitudes.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.22 adopted to be effective September 1, 1996, 21 TexReg 4311; amended to be effective September 1, 1998, 23 TexReg 5675; amended to be effective December 25, 2007, 32 TexReg 9623

§74.23: Correspondence Courses and Distance Learning

Credit toward state graduation requirements may be granted under this section only under the following conditions.

(1) The institution offering correspondence courses must be The University of Texas at Austin, Texas Tech University, or another public institution of higher education approved by the commissioner of education.

(2) Students may earn course credit through distance learning technologies, such as, but not limited to, satellite, Internet, two-way video-conferencing, and instructional television.

(3) The correspondence and distance learning courses must include the essential knowledge and skills as specified in §74.1 of this title (relating to Essential Knowledge and Skills) for such a course.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.23 adopted to be effective September 1, 1996, 21 TexReg 4311; amended to be effective September 1, 1998, 23 TexReg 5675; amended to be effective September 1, 2001, 25 TexReg 7691

§74.24: Credit by Examination

(a) General provisions.

(1) A school district must provide at least three days between January 1 and June 30 and three days between July 1 and December 31 annually when examinations for acceleration for each primary school grade level and for credit for secondary school academic subjects required under Texas Education Code, §28.023, shall be administered in Grades 1-12. The days do not need to be consecutive but must be designed to meet the needs of all students. The dates must be publicized in the community.

(2) A school district shall not charge for an examination for acceleration for each primary school grade level or for credit for secondary school academic subjects. If a parent requests an alternative examination, the district may administer and recognize results of a test purchased by the parent or student from Texas Tech University or The University of Texas at Austin.

(A) Texas Tech University and The University of Texas at Austin shall ensure that the assessments they provide for the purposes of this section are aligned with and contain appropriate breadth of coverage of the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for the appropriate course.

(B) Texas Tech University and The University of Texas at Austin shall arrange for a third party to conduct an audit, on a rotating basis, of at least 20% of the assessments they provide for the purposes of this section. The audit shall be conducted annually.

(C) The results of each audit shall be provided to the Texas Education Agency in the form of a report to be delivered no later than May 31 of each year.

(3) A school district must have the approval of the district board of trustees to develop its own tests or to purchase examinations that thoroughly test the essential knowledge and skills in the applicable grade level or subject area.

(4) A school district may allow a student to accelerate at a time other than one required in paragraph (1) of this subsection by developing a cost-free option approved by the district board of trustees that allows students to demonstrate academic achievement or proficiency in a subject or grade level.

(b) Assessment for acceleration in kindergarten through Grade 5.

(1) A school district must develop procedures for kindergarten acceleration that are approved by the district board of trustees.

(2) A student in any of Grades 1-5 must be accelerated one grade if he or she meets the following requirements:

(A) the student scores 90% on a criterion-referenced test for the grade level he or she wants to skip in each of the following areas: language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies;

(B) a school district representative recommends that the student be accelerated; and

(C) the student's parent or guardian gives written approval for the acceleration.

(c) Assessment for course credit in Grades 6-12.

(1) A student in any of Grades 6-12 must be given credit for an academic subject in which he or she has had no prior instruction if the student scores 90% on a criterion-referenced test for the applicable course.

(2) If a student is given credit in a subject on the basis of an examination, the school district must enter the examination score on the student's transcript.

(3) In accordance with local school district policy, a student in any of Grades 6-12 may be given credit for an academic subject in which he or she had some prior instruction, if the student scores 70% on a criterion-referenced test for the applicable course.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.24 adopted to be effective September 1, 1996, 21 TexReg 7240; amended to be effective September 1, 1998, 23 TexReg 5675; amended to be effective September 1, 2001, 25 TexReg 7691; amended to be effective August 8, 2006, 31 TexReg 6212; amended to be effective September 1, 2008, 33 TexReg 1089

§74.25: High School Credit for College Courses

(a) A school district board of trustees may adopt a policy that allows a student to be awarded credit toward high school graduation for completing a college-level course. The course must be provided only by an institution of higher education that is accredited by one of the following regional accrediting associations:

(1) Southern Association of Colleges and Schools;

(2) Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools;

(3) New England Association of Schools and Colleges;

(4) North Central Association of Colleges and Schools;

(5) Western Association of Schools and Colleges; or

(6) Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges.

(b) To be eligible to enroll and be awarded credit toward state graduation requirements, a student must have the approval of the high school principal or other school official designated by the school district. The course for which credit is awarded must provide advanced academic instruction beyond, or in greater depth than, the essential knowledge and skills for the equivalent high school course.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.25 adopted to be effective September 1, 1996, 21 TexReg 4311; amended to be effective September 1, 1998, 23 TexReg 5675; amended to be effective September 1, 2001, 25 TexReg 7691

§74.26: Award of Credit

(a) The award of credit for a course by a school district affirms that a student has satisfactorily met all state and local requirements. Any course for which credit is awarded must be provided according to this subsection.

(1) Credit earned toward state graduation requirements by a student in an accredited school district shall be transferable and must be accepted by any other school district in the state. A district may not prohibit a new student from attending school pending receipt of transcripts or records from the school district the student previously attended. Credit earned in a local-credit course may be transferred only with the consent of the receiving school district.

(2) A school district must ensure that the records or transcripts of an out-of-state or out-of-country transfer student (including foreign exchange students) or a transfer student from a Texas nonpublic school are evaluated and that the student is placed in appropriate classes promptly. The district may use a variety of methods to verify the content of courses for which a transfer student has earned credit.

(b) Districts may offer courses designated for Grades 9-12 (refer to §74.11 of this title (relating to High School Graduation Requirements)) in earlier grade levels. A course must be considered completed and credit must be awarded if the student has demonstrated achievement by meeting the standard requirements of the course, including demonstrated proficiency in the subject matter, regardless of the time the student has received instruction in the course or the grade level at which proficiency was attained. The academic achievement record (transcript) shall reflect that students have satisfactorily completed courses at earlier grade levels than Grades 9-12 and have been awarded state graduation credits.

(c) Credit for courses for high school graduation may be earned only if the student received a grade which is the equivalent of 70 on a scale of 100, based upon the essential knowledge and skills for each course.

(d) In accordance with local district policy, students who are able to successfully complete only one semester of a two-semester course can be awarded credit proportionately.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.26 adopted to be effective September 1, 1996, 21 TexReg 4311; amended to be effective September 1, 1998, 23 TexReg 5675; amended to be effective September 1, 2001, 25 TexReg 7691

§74.27: Innovative Courses and Programs

A school district may offer innovative courses to enable students to master knowledge, skills, and competencies not included in the essential knowledge and skills of the required curriculum.

(1) The State Board of Education (SBOE) may approve any course that does not fall within any of the subject areas listed in the foundation and enrichment curricula when the applying school district or organization demonstrates that the proposed course is academically rigorous and addresses documented student needs.

(2) The commissioner of education may approve a discipline-based course in the foundation or enrichment curriculum when the applying school district or organization demonstrates that the proposed course is academically challenging and addresses documented student needs.

(3) To request approval from the SBOE or the commissioner of education, the applying school district or organization must submit a request for approval at least six months before planned implementation that includes:

(A) a description of the course and its essential knowledge and skills;

(B) the rationale and justification for the request in terms of student need;

(C) a description of activities, major resources, and materials to be used;

(D) the methods of evaluating student outcomes;

(E) the qualifications of the teacher; and

(F) the amount of credit requested.

(4) With the approval of the local board of trustees, a school district may offer, without modifications, any state-approved innovative course.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.27 adopted to be effective September 1, 1996, 21 TexReg 4311; amended to be effective September 1, 1998, 23 TexReg 5675; amended to be effective September 1, 2001, 25 TexReg 7691; amended to be effective December 25, 2007, 32 TexReg 9623

§74.28: Students with Dyslexia and Related Disorders

(a) The board of trustees of a school district must ensure that procedures for identifying a student with dyslexia or a related disorder and for providing appropriate instructional services to the student are implemented in the district. These procedures will be monitored by the Texas Education Agency with on-site visits conducted as appropriate.

(b) A school district's procedures must be implemented according to the State Board of Education (SBOE) approved strategies for screening, and techniques for treating, dyslexia and related disorders. The strategies and techniques are described in "Procedures Concerning Dyslexia and Related Disorders," a set of flexible guidelines for local districts that may be modified by SBOE only with broad-based dialogue that includes input from educators and professionals in the field of reading and dyslexia and related disorders from across the state. Screening should only be done by individuals/professionals who are trained to assess students for dyslexia and related disorders.

(c) A school district shall purchase a reading program or develop its own reading program for students with dyslexia and related disorders, as long as the program is characterized by the descriptors found in "Procedures Concerning Dyslexia and Related Disorders." Teachers who screen and treat these students must be trained in instructional strategies which utilize individualized, intensive, multisensory, phonetic methods and a variety of writing and spelling components described in the "Procedures Concerning Dyslexia and Related Disorders" and in the professional development activities specified by each district and/or campus planning and decision making committee.

(d) Before an identification or assessment procedure is used selectively with an individual student, the school district must notify the student's parent or guardian or another person standing in parental relation to the student.

(e) Parents/guardians of students eligible under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, §504, must be informed of all services and options available to the student under that federal statute.

(f) Each school must provide each identified student access at his or her campus to the services of a teacher trained in dyslexia and related disorders. The school district may, with the approval of each student's parents or guardians, offer additional services at a centralized location. Such centralized services shall not preclude each student from receiving services at his or her campus.

(g) Because early intervention is critical, a program for early identification, intervention, and support for students with dyslexia and related disorders must be available in each district as outlined in the "Procedures Concerning Dyslexia and Related Disorders."

(h) Each school district shall provide a parent education program for parents/guardians of students with dyslexia and related disorders. This program should include: awareness of characteristics of dyslexia and related disorders; information on testing and diagnosis of dyslexia; information on effective strategies for teaching dyslexic students; and awareness of information on modification, especially modifications allowed on standardized testing.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.28 adopted to be effective September 1, 1996, 21 TexReg 4311; amended to be effective September 1, 2001, 25 TexReg 7691; amended to be effective August 8, 2006, 31 TexReg 6212

§74.29: Texas Advanced Placement Incentive Program

(a) Purpose. The Texas advanced placement incentive program is created to recognize and reward students, teachers, and schools that demonstrate success in achieving the educational goals of the state. An award or a subsidy granted under this section shall be for the public purpose of promoting an educated citizenry.

(b) Types of awards.

(1) A school participating in the program shall be eligible to receive the following awards:

(A) a one-time, $3,000 equipment grant for providing a College Board advanced placement or International Baccalaureate course, based on need as determined by the commissioner of education; and

(B) $100 for each student who receives a score of three or better on a College Board advanced placement or International Baccalaureate test.

(2) A teacher who teaches a College Board advanced placement or International Baccalaureate course shall be eligible to receive the following awards:

(A) a subsidy of up to $450 per teacher for teacher training for College Board advanced placement or International Baccalaureate courses;

(B) a one-time award of $250 for teaching a College Board advanced placement or International Baccalaureate course for the first time; and

(C) a share of the teacher bonus pool proportional to the number of courses taught that shall be distributed by the teacher's school. Fifty dollars may be deposited in the teacher bonus pool for each student enrolled in the school who receives a score of three or better on a College Board advanced placement or International Baccalaureate test.

(3) A student who receives a score of three or better on a College Board advanced placement or International Baccalaureate test may receive a reimbursement of up to $65 for the advanced placement or International Baccalaureate testing fee. The reimbursement shall be reduced by the amount of any subsidy awarded by the College Board or International Baccalaureate or under subsection (e) of this section.

(c) Award adjustment. The commissioner of education shall adjust and prorate by category the sum and number of awards to ensure the purpose of the program is realized.

(d) Application for, and use of, awards.

(1) To obtain an award, a school or teacher must submit to the State Board of Education (SBOE) a written application in a form, manner, and time prescribed by the commissioner of education. The intended recipient of the award must submit the application.

(2) A school must give priority to academic enhancement purposes in using any award received under this section. An award may not be used for any purpose relating to athletics.

(e) Subsidies for College Board advanced placement or International Baccalaureate tests.

(1) A student is entitled to a subsidy for the fee he or she pays to take a College Board advanced placement or International Baccalaureate test if the student demonstrates financial need according to guidelines adopted by the College Board.

(2) The Texas Education Agency (TEA), with SBOE approval, may pay each eligible applicant an equal amount of up to $25.

(f) Funding of awards and subsidies.

(1) An award or a subsidy granted under this section is subject to the availability of funds. An award or a subsidy may be funded by donations, grants, or legislative appropriations.

(2) The commissioner of education may solicit and receive a grant or donation for the purpose of making awards under this section. The TEA shall account for and distribute any donation, grant, or legislative appropriation.

(3) The TEA shall apply to the program any available funds from its appropriations that may be used for this purpose.

(4) An application for funding may be filed with TEA at a date determined by the commissioner of education.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.29 adopted to be effective September 1, 1996, 21 TexReg 4311; amended to be effective September 1, 2001, 25 TexReg 7691

§74.30: Identification of Honors Courses

(a) The following are identified as honors classes as referred to in the Texas Education Code, §33.081(d)(1), concerning extracurricular activities:

(1) all College Board advanced placement courses and International Baccalaureate courses in all disciplines;

(2) English language arts: high school/college concurrent enrollment classes that are included in the "Community College General Academic Course Guide Manual (Part One)";

(3) Languages other than English: high school/college concurrent enrollment classes that are included in the "Community College General Academic Course Guide Manual (Part One)," and languages other than English courses Levels IV-VII;

(4) Mathematics: high school/college concurrent enrollment classes that are included in the "Community College General Academic Course Guide Manual (Part One) " and Precalculus;

(5) Science: high school/college concurrent enrollment classes that are included in the "Community College General Academic Course Guide Manual (Part One)"; and

(6) Social studies: Social Studies Advanced Studies, Economics Advanced Studies, and high school/college concurrent enrollment classes that are included in the "Community College General Academic Course Guide Manual (Part One)."

(b) Districts may identify additional honors courses in the subject areas of English language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, economics, or a language other than English for the purpose of this section, but must identify such courses prior to the semester in which any exemptions related to extracurricular activities occur.

(c) Districts are neither required to nor restricted from considering courses as honors for the purpose of grade point average calculation.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.30 adopted to be effective September 1, 1996, 21 TexReg 4311; amended to be effective September 1, 1998, 23 TexReg 5675; amended to be effective June 23, 2008, 33 TexReg 4883

§74.31: Health Classifications for Physical Education

For physical education, a district must classify each student, on the basis of health, into one of the following categories.

(1) Unrestricted (not limited in activities).

(2) Restricted (excludes the more vigorous activities).

(A) Permanent. A member of the healing arts licensed to practice in Texas must provide the school written documentation concerning the nature of the impairment and the expectations for physical activity for the student.

(B) Temporary. The student may be restricted from physical activity of the physical education class. A member of the healing arts licensed to practice in Texas must provide the school written documentation concerning the nature of the temporary impairment and the expected amount of time for recovery. During recovery time, the student must continue to learn the concepts of the lessons but may not actively participate in the skill demonstration.

(3) Adapted and remedial (specific activities prescribed or prohibited, as directed by a member of the healing arts licensed to practice in Texas).

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.31 adopted to be effective September 1, 2001, 25 TexReg 7691

§74.33: Additional Requirements for Social Studies Classes for Grades 3 - 12

(a) Instruction during Celebrate Freedom Week. Each social studies class shall include, during Celebrate Freedom Week as provided under Texas Education Code, §29.907, or during another full school week as determined by the board of trustees of a school district, appropriate instruction concerning the intent, meaning, and importance of the Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution, including the Bill of Rights, in their historical contexts. The study of the Declaration of Independence must include the study of the relationship of the ideas expressed in that document to subsequent American history, including the relationship of its ideas to the rich diversity of our people as a nation of immigrants, the American Revolution, the formulation of the United States Constitution, and the abolitionist movement, which led to the Emancipation Proclamation and the women's suffrage movement.

(b) Recitation during Celebrate Freedom Week.

(1) Each school district shall require that, during Celebrate Freedom Week or other week of instruction prescribed under subsection (a) of this section, students in Grades 3 - 12 study and recite the following text: "We hold these Truths to be self-evident, that all Men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness--That to secure these Rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just Powers from the Consent of the Governed."

(2) Each school district shall excuse from the recitation a student:

(A) whose parent or guardian submits to the district a written request that the student be excused;

(B) who, as determined by the district, has a conscientious objection to the recitation; or

(C) who is the child of a representative of a foreign government to whom the United States government extends diplomatic immunity.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.33 adopted to be effective December 7, 2003, 28 TexReg 10935

§74.34: Additional Requirements for Economics Classes, Grades 9-12

(a) A school district and an open-enrollment charter school shall incorporate instruction in personal financial literacy into any course meeting a requirement for an economics credit, using the materials approved by the State Board of Education for this purpose in accordance with Texas Education Code, §28.0021.

(b) A school district may add elements at its discretion but must include the following areas of instruction:

(1) understanding interest and avoiding and eliminating credit card debt;

(2) understanding the rights and responsibilities of renting or buying a home;

(3) managing money to make the transition from renting a home to home ownership;

(4) starting a small business;

(5) being a prudent investor in the stock market and using other investment options;

(6) beginning a savings program and planning for retirement;

(7) bankruptcy;

(8) the types of bank accounts available to consumers and the benefits of maintaining a bank account;

(9) balancing a checkbook;

(10) the types of loans available to consumers and becoming a low-risk borrower;

(11) understanding insurance; and

(12) charitable giving.

(c) A school district or open-enrollment charter school may apply to the commissioner of education for an extension in complying with the requirements of this section for the 2006-2007 school year.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.34 adopted to be effective August 8, 2006, 31 TexReg 6212

§74.35: Additional Requirements for High School Health Classes

(a) Parenting and paternity awareness.

(1) A school district and an open-enrollment charter school shall incorporate instruction in parenting awareness into any course meeting a requirement for a health education credit, using the materials approved by the State Board of Education for this purpose in accordance with Texas Education Code (TEC), §28.002(p). Implementation of this requirement shall comply with requirements that the board of trustees of each school district establish a local school health advisory council to assist the district in ensuring that local community values are reflected in the district's health education instruction as stated in TEC, §28.004.

(2) A school district may add elements at its discretion but must include the following areas of instruction:

(A) parenting skills and responsibilities, including child support;

(B) relationship skills, including money management, communication, and marriage preparation; and

(C) skills relating to the prevention of family violence, only if the school district's high schools do not have a family violence prevention program.

(3) If the required high school health education credit is earned through a course taken prior to Grade 9, the materials and parenting awareness instruction must be incorporated into that course or, at the district's discretion, may be incorporated into another course available to all students in Grades 9-12.

(4) At the discretion of the district, a teacher may modify the suggested sequence and pace of the program at any grade level.

(5) A student under 14 years of age may not participate in a parenting and paternity awareness program without the permission of the student's parent or person standing in parental relation to the student.

(6) A school district shall use the materials approved by the State Board of Education for this purpose beginning with the 2008-2009 school year.

(b) Alcohol awareness.

(1) A school district and an open-enrollment charter school shall incorporate instruction in the dangers, causes, consequences, signs, symptoms, and treatment of binge drinking and alcohol poisoning into any course meeting a requirement for a health education credit in accordance with TEC, §28.002(r).

(2) A school district shall choose an evidence-based alcohol awareness program to use in the district's middle school, junior high school, and high school health curriculum from a list of programs approved by the commissioner of education for this purpose.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.35 adopted to be effective April 27, 2008, 33 TexReg 3261; amended to be effective December 23, 2009, 34 TexReg 9198

§74.36: Requirements for Elective Courses on the Bible's Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament) and New Testament and Their Impact on the History and Literature of Western Civilization

(a) Pursuant to this rule, a school district may offer to students in Grade 9 or above:

(1) an elective course on the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament) and its impact and an elective course on the New Testament and its impact; or

(2) an elective course that combines the courses on the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament) and its impact and on the New Testament and its impact.

(b) The purpose of a course under this section is to:

(1) teach students knowledge of biblical content, characters, poetry, and narratives that are prerequisites to understanding contemporary society and culture, including literature, art, music, mores, oratory, and public policy; and

(2) familiarize students with, as applicable:

(A) the contents of the Hebrew Scriptures or New Testament;

(B) the history of the Hebrew Scriptures or New Testament;

(C) the literary style and structure of the Hebrew Scriptures or New Testament; and

(D) the influence of the Hebrew Scriptures or New Testament on law, history, government, literature, art, music, customs, morals, values, and culture.

(c) A course offered under this section shall follow applicable law and all federal and state guidelines in maintaining religious neutrality and accommodating the diverse religious views, traditions, and perspectives of students in their school district. A course under this section shall not endorse, favor, or promote, or disfavor or show hostility toward, any particular religion or nonreligious faith or religious perspective.

(d) A course offered under this section shall follow the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Special Topics in Social Studies or the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Independent Study in English as set out in this subsection.

(1) Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Special Topics in Social Studies (One-Half Credit).

(A) General requirements. Students shall be awarded one-half unit of credit for successful completion of this course. Students may take this course with different course content for a maximum of two credits.

(B) Introduction. In Special Topics in Social Studies, an elective course comparable to the former Advanced Social Science Problems, students are provided the opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills of the social sciences to a variety of topics and issues. Students use critical-thinking skills to locate, organize, analyze, and use data collected from a variety of sources. Problem solving and decision making are important elements of the course as is the communication of information in written, oral, and visual forms.

(C) Knowledge and skills.

(i) Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of sources including electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(I) differentiate between, locate, and use primary and secondary sources such as computer software, databases, media and news services, biographies, interviews, and artifacts to acquire information about a selected topic in social studies;

(II) analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions;

(III) identify points of view from the historic context surrounding an event and the frame of reference that influenced the participants;

(IV) support a point of view on a social studies issue or event;

(V) identify bias in written, oral, and visual material;

(VI) evaluate the validity of a source based on language, corroboration with other sources, and information about the author; and

(VII) use appropriate mathematical skills to interpret social studies information such as maps and graphs.

(ii) Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:

(I) use social studies terminology correctly;

(II) use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation;

(III) transfer information from one medium to another, including written to visual and statistical to written or visual, using computer software as appropriate; and

(IV) create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information.

(iii) Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:

(I) use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and

(II) use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision.

(2) Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Independent Study in English (One-Half to One Credit).

(A) Introduction. Students enrolled in Independent Study in English write in a variety of forms for a variety of audiences and purposes. High school students are expected to plan, draft, and complete written compositions on a regular basis, and carefully examine their papers for clarity, engaging language, and the correct use of the conventions and mechanics of written English. Independent Study in English students are expected to write in a variety of forms including business, personal, literary, and persuasive texts for a variety of audiences and purposes. Writing is used as a tool for learning as students create, clarify, critique, and express appreciation for others' ideas and responses. Independent Study in English students evaluate their own written work as well as the work of others. Students continue to read extensively in increasingly difficult texts selected in multiple genres for a variety of purposes. When comprehension breaks down, students effectively and efficiently monitor and adjust their use of a variety of comprehension strategies. Students respond to texts through talking and writing in both traditional print and electronic formats. Students connect their knowledge of the world and the knowledge they gather from other texts with the text being read. For high school students whose first language is not English, the students' native language serves as a foundation for English language acquisition and language learning.

(B) Knowledge and skills.

(i) Writing. The student uses writing as a tool for learning and research. The student is expected to:

(I) use writing to formulate questions, refine topics, and clarify ideas;

(II) use writing to organize and support what is known and what needs to be learned about a topic;

(III) compile information from primary and secondary sources using available technology;

(IV) use writing to discover, record, review, and learn;

(V) organize notes from multiple sources, including primary and secondary sources, in useful and informing ways;

(VI) link related information and ideas from a variety of sources;

(VII) represent information in a variety of ways such as graphics, conceptual maps, and learning logs;

(VIII) compile written ideas and representations, interpret empirical data into reports, summaries, or other formats, and draw conclusions; and

(IX) use writing as a tool such as to reflect, explore, or problem solve.

(ii) Reading. The student inquires through reading and researching self-selected and assigned topics. The student is expected to:

(I) read widely to establish a specific area of interest for further study;

(II) generate relevant, interesting, and researchable questions with instructor guidance and approval;

(III) locate appropriate print and non-print information using text and technical resources, including databases;

(IV) use text organizers such as overviews, headings, and graphic features to locate and categorize information;

(V) organize and record new information in systematic ways such as notes, charts, and graphic organizers;

(VI) produce research projects and reports in various forms for audiences;

(VII) draw relevant questions for further study from the research findings or conclusions; and

(VIII) conduct a research project(s), producing an original work in print or another medium with a demonstration of advanced skill.

(iii) Viewing/representing. The student produces visual representations that communicate with others. The student is expected to:

(I) use a range of techniques in planning and creating media text; and

(II) prepare and present a research project.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.36 adopted to be effective September 1, 2008, 33 TexReg 7159

§74.37: Public School Physical Education Curriculum

(a) The essential knowledge and skills for physical education shall:

(1) emphasize the knowledge and skills capable of being used during a lifetime of regular physical activity;

(2) be consistent with national physical education standards for:

(A) the information that students should learn about physical activity; and

(B) the physical activities that students should be able to perform;

(3) meet the needs of students of all physical ability levels, including students who have a disability, chronic health problem, or other special need that precludes the student from participating in regular physical education instruction but who might be able to participate in physical education that is suitably adapted and, if applicable, included in the student's individualized education program;

(4) take into account the effect that gender and cultural differences might have on the degree of student interest in physical activity or on the types of physical activity in which a student is interested;

(5) ensure students develop self-management and movement skills;

(6) ensure students develop cooperation, fair play, and responsible participation in physical activity; and

(7) promote student participation in physical activity outside of school.

(b) A physical education course shall:

(1) offer students an opportunity to choose among many types of physical activity in which to participate;

(2) offer students both cooperative and competitive games; and

(3) be an enjoyable experience for students.

(c) On a weekly basis, at least 50% of a physical education class shall be used for actual student physical activity and the activity shall be, to the extent practicable, at a moderate or vigorous level.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.37 adopted to be effective December 23, 2009, 34 TexReg 9198

Subchapter D

§74.41: High School Graduation Requirements

(a) Graduates of each high school are awarded the same type of diploma. The academic achievement record (transcript), rather than the diploma, records individual accomplishments, achievements, and courses completed and displays appropriate graduation seals.

(b) All credit for graduation must be earned no later than Grade 12.

(c) To receive a high school diploma, a student entering Grade 9 in the 2001-2002 school year and thereafter must complete the following:

(1) requirements of the minimum high school program specified in §74.42 of this title (relating to Minimum High School Program), the recommended high school program specified in §74.43 of this title (relating to Recommended High School Program), or the advanced program specified in §74.44 of this title (relating to Distinguished Achievement High School Program); and

(2) testing requirements for graduation as specified in Chapter 101 of this title (relating to Assessment).

(d) A maximum of three credits of reading (selected from Reading I, II, or III) may be offered by districts for state graduation elective credit for identified students under the following conditions.

(1) The school district board of trustees shall adopt policies to identify students in need of additional reading instruction.

(2) District procedures shall include assessment of individual student needs, ongoing evaluation of each student's progress, and monitoring of instructional activities to ensure that student needs are addressed.

(e) An out-of-state or out-of-country transfer student (including foreign exchange students) or a transfer student from a Texas nonpublic school is eligible to receive a Texas diploma, but must complete all requirements of this section to satisfy state graduation requirements. Any course credit required in this section that is not completed by the student before he or she enrolls in a Texas school district may be satisfied through the provisions of §74.23 of this title (relating to Correspondence Courses and Distance Learning) and §74.24 of this title (relating to Credit by Examination) or by completing the course or courses according to the provisions of §74.26 of this title (relating to Award of Credit).

(f) Elective credits in all three graduation programs may be selected from the following:

(1) the list of courses approved by the State Board of Education (SBOE) for Grades 9-12 as specified in §74.1 of this title (relating to Essential Knowledge and Skills);

(2) state-approved innovative courses as specified in §74.27 of this chapter (relating to Innovative Courses and Programs);

(3) Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC)--one to four credits;

(4) Driver Education--one-half credit.

(g) College Board advanced placement and International Baccalaureate courses may be substituted for courses required in appropriate areas in all three high school graduation programs. College Board advanced placement and International Baccalaureate courses may be used as electives in all three high school graduation programs.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.41 adopted to be effective September 1, 2001, 25 TexReg 7691

§74.42: Minimum High School Program

(a) Credits. A student must earn at least 22 credits to complete the Minimum High School Program.

(b) Core Courses. A student must demonstrate proficiency in the following.

(1) English language arts--four credits. The credits must consist of:

(A) English I, II, and III (English I for Speakers of Other Languages and English II for Speakers of Other Languages may be substituted for English I and II only for immigrant students with limited English proficiency); and

(B) Fourth credit of English, which may be satisfied by English IV, Research/Technical Writing, Creative/Imaginative Writing, Practical Writing Skills, Literary Genres, Business Communication, Journalism, or concurrent enrollment in a college English course.

(2) Mathematics--three credits to include Algebra I and Geometry.

(3) Science--two credits. The credits must consist of Biology and Integrated Physics and Chemistry (IPC). A student may substitute Chemistry or Physics for IPC and then must use the second of these two courses as the academic elective credit identified in subsection (b)(6) of this section.

(4) Social studies--two and one-half credits. The credits must consist of World History Studies (one credit) or World Geography Studies (one credit), United States History Studies Since Reconstruction (one credit), and United States Government (one-half credit).

(5) Economics, with emphasis on the free enterprise system and its benefits--one-half credit. The credit must consist of Economics with Emphasis on the Free Enterprise System and Its Benefits.

(6) Academic elective--one credit. The credit must be selected from World History Studies, World Geography Studies, or any science course approved by the State Board of Education (SBOE) for science credit as found in Chapter 112 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Science). If a student elects to replace IPC with either Chemistry or Physics as described in subsection (b)(3) of this section, the academic elective must be the other of these two science courses.

(7) Physical education--one and one-half credits to include Foundations of Personal Fitness (one-half credit).

(A) A student may not earn more than two credits in physical education toward state graduation requirements.

(B) The school district board of trustees may allow a student to substitute certain physical activities for the required credits in physical education, including the Foundations of Personal Fitness. The substitutions must be based on the physical activity involved in drill team, marching band, and cheerleading during the fall semester; Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC); athletics; Dance I-IV; two- or three-credit career and technology work-based training courses, and off-campus physical education.

(C) In accordance with local district policy, a school district may award up to two credits for physical education for appropriate private or commercially-sponsored physical activity programs conducted on or off campus. The district must apply to the commissioner of education for approval of such programs, which may be substituted for state graduation credit in physical education. Such approval may be granted under the following conditions:

(i) Olympic-level participation and/or competition includes a minimum of 15 hours per week of highly intensive, professional, supervised training. The training facility, instructors, and the activities involved in the program must be certified by the superintendent to be of exceptional quality. Students qualifying and participating at this level may be dismissed from school one hour per day. Students dismissed may not miss any class other than physical education.

(ii) Private or commercially-sponsored physical activities include those certified by the superintendent to be of high quality and well supervised by appropriately trained instructors. Student participation of at least five hours per week must be required. Students certified to participate at this level may not be dismissed from any part of the regular school day.

(8) Health education--one-half credit, which may be satisfied by Health 1 or Advanced Health, or Health Science Technology--one credit, which may be satisfied by Introduction to Health Science Technology, Health Science Technology I, or Health Science Technology II.

(9) Speech--one-half credit. The credit must consist of Communication Applications.

(10) Technology applications--one credit, which may be satisfied by:

(A) the following courses in Chapter 126 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Applications): Computer Science I, Computer Science II, Desktop Publishing, Digital Graphics/Animation, Multimedia, Video Technology, Web Mastering, or Independent Study in Technology Applications;

(B) the following courses in Chapter 120 of this title (relating to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Business Education): Business Computer Information Systems I or II, Business Computer Programming, Telecommunications and Networking, or Business Image Management and Multimedia; or

(C) the following courses in Chapter 123 of this title (relating to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Education/Industrial Technology Education): Computer Applications, Technology Systems (modular computer laboratory-based), Communications Graphics (modular computer laboratory-based), or Computer Multimedia and Animation Technology.

(c) Elective Courses--five and one-half credits. The credits must be selected from the list of courses specified in §74.41(f) of this title (relating to High School Graduation Requirements).

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.42 adopted to be effective September 1, 2001, 25 TexReg 7691

§74.43: Recommended High School Program

(a) Credits. A student must earn at least 24 credits to complete the Recommended High School Program.

(b) Core Courses. A student must demonstrate proficiency in the following:

(1) English language arts--four credits. The credits must consist of English I, II, III, and IV (English I for Speakers of Other Languages and English II for Speakers of Other Languages may be substituted for English I and II only for immigrant students with limited English proficiency).

(2) Mathematics--three credits. The credits must consist of Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry.

(3) Science--three credits. One credit must be a biology credit (Biology, Advanced Placement (AP) Biology, or International Baccalaureate (IB) Biology). Students must choose the remaining two credits from the following areas. Not more than one credit may be chosen from each of the areas to satisfy this requirement. Students on the Recommended High School Program are encouraged to take courses in biology, chemistry, and physics to complete the science requirements.

(A) Integrated Physics and Chemistry (IPC);

(B) Chemistry, AP Chemistry, or IB Chemistry; and

(C) Physics, Principles of Technology I, AP Physics, or IB Physics.

(4) Social studies--three and one-half credits. The credits must consist of World History Studies (one credit), World Geography Studies (one credit), United States History Studies Since Reconstruction (one credit), and United States Government (one-half credit).

(5) Economics, with emphasis on the free enterprise system and its benefits--one-half credit. The credit must consist of Economics with Emphasis on the Free Enterprise System and Its Benefits.

(6) Languages other than English--two credits. The credits earned must be for any two levels in the same language.

(7) Physical education--one and one-half credits to include Foundations of Personal Fitness (one-half credit).

(A) A student may not earn more than two credits in physical education toward state graduation requirements.

(B) The school district board of trustees may allow a student to substitute certain physical activities for the required credits in physical education, including the Foundations of Personal Fitness. The substitutions must be based on the physical activity involved in drill team, marching band, and cheerleading during the fall semester; Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC); athletics; Dance I - IV; and two- or three-credit career and technology work-based training courses.

(C) In accordance with local district policy, a school district may award up to two credits for physical education for appropriate private or commercially-sponsored physical activity programs conducted on or off campus. The district must apply to the commissioner of education for approval of such programs, which may be substituted for state graduation credit in physical education. Such approval may be granted under the following conditions:

(i) Olympic-level participation and/or competition includes a minimum of 15 hours per week of highly intensive, professional, supervised training. The training facility, instructors, and the activities involved in the program must be certified by the superintendent to be of exceptional quality. Students qualifying and participating at this level may be dismissed from school one hour per day. Students dismissed may not miss any class other than physical education.

(ii) Private or commercially-sponsored physical activities include those certified by the superintendent to be of high quality and well supervised by appropriately trained instructors. Student participation of at least five hours per week must be required. Students certified to participate at this level may not be dismissed from any part of the regular school day.

(8) Health education--one-half credit, which may satisfied by Health 1 or Advanced Health, or Health Science Technology--one credit, which may be satisfied by Introduction to Health Science Technology, Health Science Technology I, or Health Science Technology II.

(9) Speech--one-half credit. The credit must consist of Communication Applications.

(10) Technology applications--one credit, which may be satisfied by:

(A) the following courses in Chapter 126 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Applications): Computer Science I, Computer Science II, Desktop Publishing, Digital Graphics/Animation, Multimedia, Video Technology, Web Mastering, or Independent Study in Technology Applications;

(B) the following courses in Chapter 120 of this title (relating to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Business Education): Business Computer Information Systems I or II, Business Computer Programming, Telecommunications and Networking, or Business Image Management and Multimedia; or

(C) the following courses in Chapter 123 of this title (relating to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Education/Industrial Technology Education): Computer Applications, Technology Systems (modular computer laboratory-based), Communications Graphics (modular computer laboratory-based), or Computer Multimedia and Animation Technology.

(11) Fine arts--one credit, which may be satisfied by any course in Chapter 117, Subchapter C, of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Fine Arts).

(c) Elective Courses--three and one-half credits. The credits may be selected from the list of courses specified in §74.41(f) of this title (relating to High School Graduation Requirements). All students who wish to complete the Recommended High School Program are encouraged to study each of the four foundation curriculum areas (English language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies) every year in high school.

(d) Substitutions. No substitutions are allowed in the Recommended High School Program, except as specified in this chapter.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.43 adopted to be effective September 1, 2001, 25 TexReg 7691; amended to be effective August 8, 2006, 31 TexReg 6212

§74.44: Distinguished Achievement High School Program--Advanced High School Program

(a) Credits. A student must earn at least 24 credits to complete the Distinguished Achievement High School Program.

(b) Core Courses. A student must demonstrate proficiency in the following:

(1) English language arts--four credits. The credits must consist of English I, II, III, and IV (English I for Speakers of Other Languages and English II for Speakers of Other Languages may be substituted for English I and II only for immigrant students with limited English proficiency).

(2) Mathematics--three credits. The credits must consist of Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry.

(3) Science--three credits. One credit must be a biology credit (Biology, Advanced Placement (AP) Biology, or International Baccalaureate (IB) Biology). Students must choose the remaining two credits from the following areas. Not more than one credit may be chosen from each of the areas to satisfy this requirement. Students on the Distinguished Achievement High School Program are encouraged to take courses in biology, chemistry, and physics to complete the science requirements.

(A) Integrated Physics and Chemistry (IPC);

(B) Chemistry, AP Chemistry, or IB Chemistry; and

(C) Physics, Principles of Technology I, AP Physics, or IB Physics.

(4) Social studies--three and one-half credits. The credits must consist of World History Studies (one credit), World Geography Studies (one credit), United States History Studies Since Reconstruction (one credit), and United States Government (one-half credit).

(5) Economics, with emphasis on the free enterprise system and its benefits--one-half credit. The credit must consist of Economics with Emphasis on the Free Enterprise System and Its Benefits.

(6) Languages other than English--three credits. The credits earned must be for any three levels in the same language.

(7) Physical education--one and one-half credits to include Foundations of Personal Fitness (one-half credit).

(A) A student may not earn more than two credits in physical education toward state graduation requirements.

(B) The school district board of trustees may allow a student to substitute certain physical activities for the required credits in physical education, including the Foundations of Personal Fitness. The substitutions must be based on the physical activity involved in drill team, marching band, and cheerleading during the fall semester; Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC); athletics; Dance I - IV; and two- or three-credit career and technology work-based training courses.

(C) In accordance with local district policy, a school district may award up to two credits for physical education for appropriate private or commercially-sponsored physical activity programs conducted on or off campus. The district must apply to the commissioner of education for approval of such programs, which may be substituted for state graduation credit in physical education. Such approval may be granted under the following conditions:

(i) Olympic-level participation and/or competition includes a minimum of 15 hours per week of highly intensive, professional, supervised training. The training facility, instructors, and the activities involved in the program must be certified by the superintendent to be of exceptional quality. Students qualifying and participating at this level may be dismissed from school one hour per day. Students dismissed may not miss any class other than physical education.

(ii) Private or commercially-sponsored physical activities include those certified by the superintendent to be of high quality and well supervised by appropriately trained instructors. Student participation of at least five hours per week must be required. Students certified to participate at this level may not be dismissed from any part of the regular school day.

(8) Health education--one-half credit, which may be satisfied by Health 1 or Advanced Health, or Health Science Technology--one credit, which may be satisfied by Introduction to Health Science Technology, Health Science Technology I, or Health Science Technology II.

(9) Speech--one-half credit. The credit must consist of Communication Applications.

(10) Technology applications--one credit, which may be satisfied by:

(A) the following courses in Chapter 126 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Applications): Computer Science I, Computer Science II, Desktop Publishing, Digital Graphics/Animation, Multimedia, Video Technology, Web Mastering, or Independent Study in Technology Applications;

(B) the following courses in Chapter 120 of this title (relating to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Business Education): Business Computer Information Systems I or II, Business Computer Programming, Telecommunications and Networking, or Business Image Management and Multimedia; or

(C) the following courses in Chapter 123 of this title (relating to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Education/Industrial Technology Education): Computer Applications, Technology Systems (modular computer laboratory-based), Communications Graphics (modular computer laboratory-based), or Computer Multimedia and Animation Technology.

(11) Fine arts--one credit, which may be satisfied by any course in Chapter 117, Subchapter C, of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Fine Arts).

(c) Elective Courses--two and one-half credits. The credits may be selected from the list of courses specified in §74.41(f) of this title (relating to High School Graduation Requirements). All students who wish to complete the Distinguished Achievement High School Program are encouraged to study each of the four foundation curriculum areas (English language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies) every year in high school.

(d) Advanced measures. A student also must achieve any combination of four of the following advanced measures. Original research/projects may not be used for more than two of the four advanced measures. The measures must focus on demonstrated student performance at the college or professional level. Student performance on advanced measures must be assessed through an external review process. The student may choose from the following options:

(1) original research/project that is:

(A) judged by a panel of professionals in the field that is the focus of the project; or

(B) conducted under the direction of mentor(s) and reported to an appropriate audience; and

(C) related to the required curriculum set forth in §74.1 of this title (relating to Essential Knowledge and Skills);

(2) test data where a student receives:

(A) a score of three or above on the College Board advanced placement examination;

(B) a score of four or above on an International Baccalaureate examination; or

(C) a score on the Preliminary Scholastic Assessment Test (PSAT) that qualifies the student for recognition as a commended scholar or higher by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation, as part of the National Hispanic Scholar Program of the College Board or as part of the National Achievement Scholarship Program for Outstanding Negro Students of the National Merit Scholarship Corporation. The PSAT score shall count as only one advanced measure regardless of the number of honors received by the student; or

(3) college academic courses, advanced technical credit courses, and dual credit courses with a grade of 3.0 or higher.

(e) Substitutions. No substitutions are allowed in the Distinguished Achievement High School Program, except as specified in this chapter.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.44 adopted to be effective September 1, 2001, 25 TexReg 7691; amended to be effective August 8, 2006, 31 TexReg 6212

Subchapter E

§74.51: High School Graduation Requirements

(a) Graduates of each high school are awarded the same type of diploma. The academic achievement record (transcript), rather than the diploma, records individual accomplishments, achievements, and courses completed and displays appropriate graduation seals.

(b) All credit for graduation must be earned no later than Grade 12.

(c) A student entering Grade 9 in the 2004 - 2005 school year and thereafter shall enroll in the courses necessary to complete the curriculum requirements for the recommended high school program specified in §74.53 of this title (relating to Recommended High School Program) or the advanced program specified in §74.54 of this title (relating to Distinguished Achievement High School Program--Advanced High School Program) unless the student, the student's parent or other persons standing in parental relation to the student, and a school counselor or school administrator agree that the student should be permitted to take courses under the minimum high school program specified in §74.52 of this title (relating to Minimum High School Program).

(d) To receive a high school diploma, a student entering Grade 9 in the 2004 - 2005 school year and thereafter must complete the following:

(1) in accordance with subsection (c) of this section, requirements of the minimum high school program specified in §74.52, the recommended high school program specified in §74.53, or the advanced program specified in §74.54; and

(2) testing requirements for graduation as specified in Chapter 101 of this title (relating to Assessment).

(e) A maximum of three credits of reading (selected from Reading I, II, or III) may be offered by districts for state graduation elective credit for identified students under the following conditions.

(1) The school district board of trustees shall adopt policies to identify students in need of additional reading instruction.

(2) District procedures shall include assessment of individual student needs, ongoing evaluation of each student's progress, and monitoring of instructional activities to ensure that student needs are addressed.

(f) An out-of-state or out-of-country transfer student (including foreign exchange students) or a transfer student from a Texas nonpublic school is eligible to receive a Texas diploma, but must complete all requirements of this section to satisfy state graduation requirements. Any course credit required in this section that is not completed by the student before he or she enrolls in a Texas school district may be satisfied through the provisions of §74.23 of this title (relating to Correspondence Courses and Distance Learning) and §74.24 of this title (relating to Credit by Examination) or by completing the course or courses according to the provisions of §74.26 of this title (relating to Award of Credit).

(g) Elective credits in all three graduation programs may be selected from the following:

(1) the list of courses approved by the State Board of Education (SBOE) for Grades 9 - 12 as specified in §74.1 of this title (relating to Essential Knowledge and Skills);

(2) state-approved innovative courses as specified in §74.27 of this chapter (relating to Innovative Courses and Programs);

(3) Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC)--one to four credits;

(4) Driver Education--one-half credit.

(h) College Board advanced placement and International Baccalaureate courses may be substituted for courses required in appropriate areas in all three high school graduation programs. College Board advanced placement and International Baccalaureate courses may be used as electives in all three high school graduation programs.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.51 adopted to be effective December 7, 2003, 28 TexReg 10936

§74.52: Minimum High School Program

(a) Credits. A student must earn at least 22 credits to complete the Minimum High School Program.

(b) Core Courses. A student must demonstrate proficiency in the following.

(1) English language arts--four credits. The credits must consist of:

(A) English I, II, and III (English I for Speakers of Other Languages and English II for Speakers of Other Languages may be substituted for English I and II only for immigrant students with limited English proficiency); and

(B) Fourth credit of English, which may be satisfied by English IV, Research/Technical Writing, Creative/Imaginative Writing, Practical Writing Skills, Literary Genres, Business Communication, Journalism, or concurrent enrollment in a college English course.

(2) Mathematics--three credits to include Algebra I and Geometry.

(3) Science--two credits. The credits must consist of Biology and Integrated Physics and Chemistry (IPC). A student may substitute Chemistry or Physics for IPC and then must use the second of these two courses as the academic elective credit identified in subsection (b)(6) of this section.

(4) Social studies--two and one-half credits. The credits must consist of World History Studies (one credit) or World Geography Studies (one credit), United States History Studies Since Reconstruction (one credit), and United States Government (one-half credit).

(5) Economics, with emphasis on the free enterprise system and its benefits--one-half credit. The credit must consist of Economics with Emphasis on the Free Enterprise System and Its Benefits.

(6) Academic elective--one credit. The credit must be selected from World History Studies, World Geography Studies, or any science course approved by the State Board of Education (SBOE) for science credit as found in Chapter 112 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Science). If a student elects to replace IPC with either Chemistry or Physics as described in subsection (b)(3) of this section, the academic elective must be the other of these two science courses.

(7) Physical education--one and one-half credits to include Foundations of Personal Fitness (one-half credit).

(A) A student may not earn more than two credits in physical education toward state graduation requirements.

(B) The school district board of trustees may allow a student to substitute certain physical activities for the required credits in physical education, including the Foundations of Personal Fitness. The substitutions must be based on the physical activity involved in drill team, marching band, and cheerleading during the fall semester; Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC); athletics; Dance I - IV; two- or three-credit career and technology work-based training courses, and off-campus physical education.

(C) In accordance with local district policy, a school district may award up to two credits for physical education for appropriate private or commercially-sponsored physical activity programs conducted on or off campus. The district must apply to the commissioner of education for approval of such programs, which may be substituted for state graduation credit in physical education. Such approval may be granted under the following conditions:

(i) Olympic-level participation and/or competition includes a minimum of 15 hours per week of highly intensive, professional, supervised training. The training facility, instructors, and the activities involved in the program must be certified by the superintendent to be of exceptional quality. Students qualifying and participating at this level may be dismissed from school one hour per day. Students dismissed may not miss any class other than physical education.

(ii) Private or commercially-sponsored physical activities include those certified by the superintendent to be of high quality and well supervised by appropriately trained instructors. Student participation of at least five hours per week must be required. Students certified to participate at this level may not be dismissed from any part of the regular school day.

(8) Health education--one-half credit, which may be satisfied by Health 1 or Advanced Health, or Health Science Technology--one credit, which may be satisfied by Introduction to Health Science Technology, Health Science Technology I, or Health Science Technology II.

(9) Speech--one-half credit. The credit must consist of Communication Applications.

(10) Technology applications--one credit, which may be satisfied by:

(A) the following courses in Chapter 126 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Applications): Computer Science I, Computer Science II, Desktop Publishing, Digital Graphics/Animation, Multimedia, Video Technology, Web Mastering, or Independent Study in Technology Applications;

(B) the following courses in Chapter 120 of this title (relating to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Business Education): Business Computer Information Systems I or II, Business Computer Programming, Telecommunications and Networking, or Business Image Management and Multimedia; or

(C) the following courses in Chapter 123 of this title (relating to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Education/Industrial Technology Education): Computer Applications, Technology Systems (modular computer laboratory-based), Communications Graphics (modular computer laboratory-based), or Computer Multimedia and Animation Technology.

(c) Elective Courses--five and one-half credits. The credits must be selected from the list of courses specified in §74.51(g) of this title (relating to High School Graduation Requirements).

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.52 adopted to be effective December 7, 2003, 28 TexReg 10936; amended to be effective August 8, 2006, 31 TexReg 6212

§74.53: Recommended High School Program

(a) Credits. A student must earn at least 24 credits to complete the Recommended High School Program.

(b) Core Courses. A student must demonstrate proficiency in the following:

(1) English language arts--four credits. The credits must consist of English I, II, III, and IV (English I for Speakers of Other Languages and English II for Speakers of Other Languages may be substituted for English I and II only for immigrant students with limited English proficiency).

(2) Mathematics--three credits. The credits must consist of Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry.

(3) Science--three credits. One credit must be a biology credit (Biology, Advanced Placement (AP) Biology, or International Baccalaureate (IB) Biology). Students must choose the remaining two credits from the following areas. Not more than one credit may be chosen from each of the areas to satisfy this requirement. Students on the Recommended High School Program are encouraged to take courses in biology, chemistry, and physics to complete the science requirements.

(A) Integrated Physics and Chemistry (IPC);

(B) Chemistry, AP Chemistry, or IB Chemistry; and

(C) Physics, Principles of Technology I, AP Physics, or IB Physics.

(4) Social studies--three and one-half credits. The credits must consist of World History Studies (one credit), World Geography Studies (one credit), United States History Studies Since Reconstruction (one credit), and United States Government (one-half credit).

(5) Economics, with emphasis on the free enterprise system and its benefits--one-half credit. The credit must consist of Economics with Emphasis on the Free Enterprise System and Its Benefits.

(6) Languages other than English--two credits. The credits earned must be for any two levels in the same language.

(7) Physical education--one and one-half credits to include Foundations of Personal Fitness (one-half credit).

(A) A student may not earn more than two credits in physical education toward state graduation requirements.

(B) The school district board of trustees may allow a student to substitute certain physical activities for the required credits in physical education, including the Foundations of Personal Fitness. The substitutions must be based on the physical activity involved in drill team, marching band, and cheerleading during the fall semester; Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC); athletics; Dance I - IV; and two- or three-credit career and technology work-based training courses.

(C) In accordance with local district policy, a school district may award up to two credits for physical education for appropriate private or commercially-sponsored physical activity programs conducted on or off campus. The district must apply to the commissioner of education for approval of such programs, which may be substituted for state graduation credit in physical education. Such approval may be granted under the following conditions:

(i) Olympic-level participation and/or competition includes a minimum of 15 hours per week of highly intensive, professional, supervised training. The training facility, instructors, and the activities involved in the program must be certified by the superintendent to be of exceptional quality. Students qualifying and participating at this level may be dismissed from school one hour per day. Students dismissed may not miss any class other than physical education.

(ii) Private or commercially-sponsored physical activities include those certified by the superintendent to be of high quality and well supervised by appropriately trained instructors. Student participation of at least five hours per week must be required. Students certified to participate at this level may not be dismissed from any part of the regular school day.

(8) Health education--one-half credit, which may satisfied by Health 1 or Advanced Health, or Health Science Technology--one credit, which may be satisfied by Introduction to Health Science Technology, Health Science Technology I, or Health Science Technology II.

(9) Speech--one-half credit. The credit must consist of Communication Applications.

(10) Technology applications--one credit, which may be satisfied by:

(A) the following courses in Chapter 126 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Applications): Computer Science I, Computer Science II, Desktop Publishing, Digital Graphics/Animation, Multimedia, Video Technology, Web Mastering, or Independent Study in Technology Applications, or state-approved technology applications innovative courses;

(B) the following courses in Chapter 120 of this title (relating to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Business Education): Business Computer Information Systems I or II, Business Computer Programming, Telecommunications and Networking, or Business Image Management and Multimedia;

(C) the following courses in Chapter 123 of this title (relating to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Education/Industrial Technology Education): Computer Applications, Technology Systems (modular computer laboratory-based), Communications Graphics (modular computer laboratory-based), or Computer Multimedia and Animation Technology; or

(D) the completion of three credits (for students participating in a coherent sequence of career and technology courses or who are enrolled in a Tech Prep high school plan of study) consisting of two or more state-approved career and technology courses in Chapters 119-125 and 127 of this title. Districts shall ensure that career and technology courses, including innovative courses, in a coherent sequence used to meet the technology applications credit are appropriate to collectively teach the knowledge and skills found in any of the approved courses listed in subparagraphs (A), (B), and (C) of this paragraph. Students pursuing the technology applications option described in this subparagraph must demonstrate proficiency in technology applications prior to the beginning of Grade 11.

(11) Fine arts--one credit, which may be satisfied by any course in Chapter 117, Subchapter C, of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Fine Arts).

(c) Elective Courses--three and one-half credits. The credits may be selected from the list of courses specified in §74.51(g) of this title (relating to High School Graduation Requirements). All students who wish to complete the Recommended High School Program are encouraged to study each of the four foundation curriculum areas (English language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies) every year in high school.

(d) Substitutions. No substitutions are allowed in the Recommended High School Program, except as specified in this chapter.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.53 adopted to be effective December 7, 2003, 28 TexReg 10936; amended to be effective August 8, 2006, 31 TexReg 6212

§74.54: Distinguished Achievement High School Program--Advanced High School Program

(a) Credits. A student must earn at least 24 credits to complete the Distinguished Achievement High School Program.

(b) Core Courses. A student must demonstrate proficiency in the following:

(1) English language arts--four credits. The credits must consist of English I, II, III, and IV (English I for Speakers of Other Languages and English II for Speakers of Other Languages may be substituted for English I and II only for immigrant students with limited English proficiency).

(2) Mathematics--three credits. The credits must consist of Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry.

(3) Science--three credits. One credit must be a biology credit (Biology, Advanced Placement (AP) Biology, or International Baccalaureate (IB) Biology). Students must choose the remaining two credits from the following areas. Not more than one credit may be chosen from each of the areas to satisfy this requirement. Students on the Distinguished Achievement High School Program are encouraged to take courses in biology, chemistry, and physics to complete the science requirements.

(A) Integrated Physics and Chemistry (IPC);

(B) Chemistry, AP Chemistry, or IB Chemistry; and

(C) Physics, Principles of Technology I, AP Physics, or IB Physics.

(4) Social studies--three and one-half credits. The credits must consist of World History Studies (one credit), World Geography Studies (one credit), United States History Studies Since Reconstruction (one credit), and United States Government (one-half credit).

(5) Economics, with emphasis on the free enterprise system and its benefits--one-half credit. The credit must consist of Economics with Emphasis on the Free Enterprise System and Its Benefits.

(6) Languages other than English--three credits. The credits earned must be for any three levels in the same language.

(7) Physical education--one and one-half credits to include Foundations of Personal Fitness (one-half credit).

(A) A student may not earn more than two credits in physical education toward state graduation requirements.

(B) The school district board of trustees may allow a student to substitute certain physical activities for the required credits in physical education, including the Foundations of Personal Fitness. The substitutions must be based on the physical activity involved in drill team, marching band, and cheerleading during the fall semester; Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC); athletics; Dance I - IV; and two- or three-credit career and technology work-based training courses.

(C) In accordance with local district policy, a school district may award up to two credits for physical education for appropriate private or commercially-sponsored physical activity programs conducted on or off campus. The district must apply to the commissioner of education for approval of such programs, which may be substituted for state graduation credit in physical education. Such approval may be granted under the following conditions:

(i) Olympic-level participation and/or competition includes a minimum of 15 hours per week of highly intensive, professional, supervised training. The training facility, instructors, and the activities involved in the program must be certified by the superintendent to be of exceptional quality. Students qualifying and participating at this level may be dismissed from school one hour per day. Students dismissed may not miss any class other than physical education.

(ii) Private or commercially-sponsored physical activities include those certified by the superintendent to be of high quality and well supervised by appropriately trained instructors. Student participation of at least five hours per week must be required. Students certified to participate at this level may not be dismissed from any part of the regular school day.

(8) Health education--one-half credit, which may be satisfied by Health 1 or Advanced Health, or Health Science Technology--one credit, which may be satisfied by Introduction to Health Science Technology, Health Science Technology I, or Health Science Technology II.

(9) Speech--one-half credit. The credit must consist of Communication Applications.

(10) Technology applications--one credit, which may be satisfied by:

(A) the following courses in Chapter 126 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Applications): Computer Science I, Computer Science II, Desktop Publishing, Digital Graphics/Animation, Multimedia, Video Technology, Web Mastering, or Independent Study in Technology Applications, or state-approved technology applications innovative courses;

(B) the following courses in Chapter 120 of this title (relating to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Business Education): Business Computer Information Systems I or II, Business Computer Programming, Telecommunications and Networking, or Business Image Management and Multimedia;

(C) the following courses in Chapter 123 of this title (relating to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Education/Industrial Technology Education): Computer Applications, Technology Systems (modular computer laboratory-based), Communications Graphics (modular computer laboratory-based), or Computer Multimedia and Animation Technology; or

(D) the completion of three credits (for students participating in a coherent sequence of career and technology courses or who are enrolled in a Tech Prep high school plan of study) consisting of two or more state-approved career and technology courses in Chapters 119-125 and 127 of this title. Districts shall ensure that career and technology courses, including innovative courses, in a coherent sequence used to meet the technology applications credit are appropriate to collectively teach the knowledge and skills found in any of the approved courses listed in subparagraphs (A), (B), and (C) of this paragraph. Students pursuing the technology applications option described in this subparagraph must demonstrate proficiency in technology applications prior to the beginning of Grade 11.

(11) Fine arts--one credit, which may be satisfied by any course in Chapter 117, Subchapter C, of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Fine Arts).

(c) Elective Courses--two and one-half credits. The credits may be selected from the list of courses specified in §74.51(g) of this title (relating to High School Graduation Requirements). All students who wish to complete the Distinguished Achievement High School Program are encouraged to study each of the four foundation curriculum areas (English language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies) every year in high school.

(d) Advanced measures. A student also must achieve any combination of four of the following advanced measures. Original research/projects may not be used for more than two of the four advanced measures. The measures must focus on demonstrated student performance at the college or professional level. Student performance on advanced measures must be assessed through an external review process. The student may choose from the following options:

(1) original research/project that is:

(A) judged by a panel of professionals in the field that is the focus of the project; or

(B) conducted under the direction of mentor(s) and reported to an appropriate audience; and

(C) related to the required curriculum set forth in §74.1 of this title (relating to Essential Knowledge and Skills);

(2) test data where a student receives:

(A) a score of three or above on the College Board advanced placement examination;

(B) a score of four or above on an International Baccalaureate examination; or

(C) a score on the Preliminary Scholastic Assessment Test (PSAT) that qualifies the student for recognition as a commended scholar or higher by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation, as part of the National Hispanic Scholar Program of the College Board or as part of the National Achievement Scholarship Program for Outstanding Negro Students of the National Merit Scholarship Corporation. The PSAT score shall count as only one advanced measure regardless of the number of honors received by the student; or

(3) college academic courses, advanced technical credit courses, and dual credit courses with a grade of 3.0 or higher.

(e) Substitutions. No substitutions are allowed in the Distinguished Achievement High School Program, except as specified in this chapter.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.54 adopted to be effective December 7, 2003, 28 TexReg 10936; amended to be effective August 8, 2006, 31 TexReg 6212

Subchapter F

§74.61: High School Graduation Requirements

(a) Graduates of each high school are awarded the same type of diploma. The academic achievement record (transcript), rather than the diploma, records individual accomplishments, achievements, and courses completed and displays appropriate graduation seals.

(b) All credit for graduation must be earned no later than Grade 12.

(c) A student entering Grade 9 in the 2007-2008 school year and thereafter shall enroll in the courses necessary to complete the curriculum requirements for the recommended high school program specified in §74.63 of this title (relating to Recommended High School Program) or the advanced program specified in §74.64 of this title (relating to Distinguished Achievement High School Program--Advanced High School Program) unless the student, the student's parent or other persons standing in parental relation to the student, and a school counselor or school administrator agree that the student should be permitted to take courses under the minimum high school program specified in §74.62 of this title (relating to Minimum High School Program). High school courses successfully completed prior to Grade 9 and the 2007-2008 school year shall count toward graduation in the manner established in this chapter for credit in the year the course is successfully completed.

(d) To receive a high school diploma, a student entering Grade 9 in the 2007-2008 school year and thereafter must complete the following:

(1) in accordance with subsection (c) of this section, requirements of the minimum high school program specified in §74.62, the recommended high school program specified in §74.63, or the advanced program specified in §74.64; and

(2) testing requirements for graduation as specified in Chapter 101 of this title (relating to Assessment).

(e) A maximum of three credits of reading (selected from Reading I, II, or III) may be offered by districts for state graduation elective credit for identified students under the following conditions.

(1) The school district board of trustees shall adopt policies to identify students in need of additional reading instruction.

(2) District procedures shall include assessment of individual student needs, ongoing evaluation of each student's progress, and monitoring of instructional activities to ensure that student needs are addressed.

(f) An out-of-state or out-of-country transfer student (including foreign exchange students) or a transfer student from a Texas nonpublic school is eligible to receive a Texas diploma, but must complete all requirements of this section to satisfy state graduation requirements. Any course credit required in this section that is not completed by the student before he or she enrolls in a Texas school district may be satisfied through the provisions of §74.23 of this title (relating to Correspondence Courses and Distance Learning) and §74.24 of this title (relating to Credit by Examination) or by completing the course or courses according to the provisions of §74.26 of this title (relating to Award of Credit).

(g) Elective credits in all three graduation programs may be selected from the following:

(1) the list of courses approved by the State Board of Education (SBOE) for Grades 9-12 as specified in §74.1 of this title (relating to Essential Knowledge and Skills);

(2) state-approved innovative courses as specified in §74.27 of this chapter (relating to Innovative Courses and Programs);

(3) Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC)--one to four credits; or

(4) Driver Education--one-half credit.

(h) College Board advanced placement and International Baccalaureate courses may be substituted for courses required in appropriate areas in all three high school graduation programs. College Board advanced placement and International Baccalaureate courses may be used as electives in all three high school graduation programs.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.61 adopted to be effective September 1, 2005, 29 TexReg 9357; amended to be effective January 9, 2007, 32 TexReg 80; amended to be effective December 25, 2007, 32 TexReg 9624

§74.62: Minimum High School Program

(a) Credits. A student must earn at least 22 credits to complete the Minimum High School Program.

(b) Core Courses. A student must demonstrate proficiency in the following.

(1) English language arts--four credits. The credits must consist of:

(A) English I, II, and III (English I for Speakers of Other Languages and English II for Speakers of Other Languages may be substituted for English I and II only for immigrant students with limited English proficiency); and

(B) Fourth credit of English, which may be satisfied by English IV, Research/Technical Writing, Creative/Imaginative Writing, Practical Writing Skills, Literary Genres, Business Communication, Journalism, or concurrent enrollment in a college English course.

(2) Mathematics--three credits to include Algebra I and Geometry.

(3) Science--two credits. The credits must consist of Biology and Integrated Physics and Chemistry (IPC). A student may substitute Chemistry or Physics for IPC and then must use the second of these two courses as the academic elective credit identified in subsection (b)(6) of this section.

(4) Social studies--two and one-half credits. The credits must consist of World History Studies (one credit) or World Geography Studies (one credit), United States History Studies Since Reconstruction (one credit), and United States Government (one-half credit).

(5) Economics, with emphasis on the free enterprise system and its benefits--one-half credit. The credit must consist of Economics with Emphasis on the Free Enterprise System and Its Benefits.

(6) Academic elective--one credit. The credit must be selected from World History Studies, World Geography Studies, or any science course approved by the State Board of Education (SBOE) for science credit as found in Chapter 112 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Science). If a student elects to replace IPC with either Chemistry or Physics as described in subsection (b)(3) of this section, the academic elective must be the other of these two science courses.

(7) Physical education--one and one-half credits to include Foundations of Personal Fitness (one-half credit).

(A) A student may not earn more than two credits in physical education toward state graduation requirements.

(B) The school district board of trustees may allow a student to substitute certain physical activities for the required credits in physical education, including the Foundations of Personal Fitness. The substitutions must be based on the physical activity involved in drill team, marching band, and cheerleading during the fall semester; Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC); athletics; Dance I-IV; two- or three-credit career and technology work-based training courses, and off-campus physical education.

(C) In accordance with local district policy, a school district may award up to two credits for physical education for appropriate private or commercially-sponsored physical activity programs conducted on or off campus. The district must apply to the commissioner of education for approval of such programs, which may be substituted for state graduation credit in physical education. Such approval may be granted under the following conditions:

(i) Olympic-level participation and/or competition includes a minimum of 15 hours per week of highly intensive, professional, supervised training. The training facility, instructors, and the activities involved in the program must be certified by the superintendent to be of exceptional quality. Students qualifying and participating at this level may be dismissed from school one hour per day. Students dismissed may not miss any class other than physical education.

(ii) Private or commercially-sponsored physical activities include those certified by the superintendent to be of high quality and well supervised by appropriately trained instructors. Student participation of at least five hours per week must be required. Students certified to participate at this level may not be dismissed from any part of the regular school day.

(8) Health education--one-half credit, which may be satisfied by Health 1 or Advanced Health, or Health Science Technology--one credit, which may be satisfied by Introduction to Health Science Technology, Health Science Technology I, or Health Science Technology II.

(9) Speech--one-half credit. The credit must consist of Communication Applications.

(10) Technology applications--one credit, which may be satisfied by:

(A) the following courses in Chapter 126 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Applications): Computer Science I, Computer Science II, Desktop Publishing, Digital Graphics/Animation, Multimedia, Video Technology, Web Mastering, or Independent Study in Technology Applications;

(B) the following courses in Chapter 120 of this title (relating to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Business Education): Business Computer Information Systems I or II, Business Computer Programming, Telecommunications and Networking, or Business Image Management and Multimedia; or

(C) the following courses in Chapter 123 of this title (relating to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Education/Industrial Technology Education): Computer Applications, Technology Systems (modular computer laboratory-based), Communications Graphics (modular computer laboratory-based), or Computer Multimedia and Animation Technology.

(c) Elective Courses--five and one-half credits. The credits must be selected from the list of courses specified in §74.61(g) of this title (relating to High School Graduation Requirements).

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.62 adopted to be effective September 1, 2005, 29 TexReg 9357

§74.63: Recommended High School Program

(a) Credits. A student must earn at least 26 credits to complete the Recommended High School Program.

(b) Core Courses. A student must demonstrate proficiency in the following:

(1) English language arts--four credits. The credits must consist of English I, II, III, and IV (English I for Speakers of Other Languages and English II for Speakers of Other Languages may be substituted for English I and II only for immigrant students with limited English proficiency).

(2) Mathematics--four credits.

(A) The credits must consist of Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry. After successful completion of Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II, a student may select the fourth required credit from any of the following courses, except as provided in subparagraph (B) of this paragraph:

(i) Precalculus;

(ii) Independent Study in Mathematics;

(iii) Advanced Placement (AP) Statistics;

(iv) AP Calculus AB;

(v) AP Calculus BC;

(vi) AP Computer Science;

(vii) International Baccalaureate (IB) Mathematical Studies Subsidiary Level;

(viii) IB Mathematical Methods Subsidiary Level;

(ix) IB Mathematics Higher Level;

(x) IB Advanced Mathematics Subsidiary Level;

(xi) concurrent enrollment in college mathematics courses; and

(xii) Mathematical Models with Applications.

(B) If selected, Mathematical Models with Applications must be taken prior to Algebra II.

(C) The SBOE may designate additional courses that meet the requirements of this paragraph.

(3) Science--four credits.

(A) One credit must be a biology credit (Biology, Advanced Placement (AP) Biology, or International Baccalaureate (IB) Biology). Students must choose two credits from the following areas. Not more than one credit may be chosen from each of the areas to satisfy this requirement.

(i) Integrated Physics and Chemistry (IPC);

(ii) Chemistry, AP Chemistry, or IB Chemistry; and

(iii) Physics, Principles of Technology I, AP Physics, or IB Physics.

(B) IPC cannot be taken as the final or fourth year of science, but must be taken before the senior year of high school. The fourth year of science may be selected from the laboratory-based courses listed in Chapter 112 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Science), with the addition of Engineering and Earth and Space Science.

(C) A student entering Grade 9 beginning with the 2012-2013 school year must take three science credits, at least one from each category, from the following areas:

(i) Biology, AP Biology, or IB Biology;

(ii) Chemistry, AP Chemistry, or IB Chemistry; and

(iii) Physics, Principles of Technology I, AP Physics, or IB Physics.

(D) The fourth year of science may be selected from the laboratory-based courses listed in Chapter 112 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Science), with the addition of Engineering and Earth and Space Science.

(E) The SBOE may designate additional courses that meet the requirements of this paragraph.

(4) Social studies--three and one-half credits. The credits must consist of World History Studies (one credit), World Geography Studies (one credit), United States History Studies Since Reconstruction (one credit), and United States Government (one-half credit).

(5) Economics, with emphasis on the free enterprise system and its benefits--one-half credit. The credit must consist of Economics with Emphasis on the Free Enterprise System and Its Benefits.

(6) Languages other than English--two credits. The credits earned must be for any two levels in the same language.

(7) Physical education--one and one-half credits to include Foundations of Personal Fitness (one-half credit).

(A) A student may not earn more than two credits in physical education toward state graduation requirements.

(B) The school district board of trustees may allow a student to substitute certain physical activities for the required credits in physical education, including the Foundations of Personal Fitness. The substitutions must be based on the physical activity involved in drill team, marching band, and cheerleading during the fall semester; Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC); athletics; Dance I-IV; and two- or three-credit career and technology work-based training courses.

(C) In accordance with local district policy, a school district may award up to two credits for physical education for appropriate private or commercially-sponsored physical activity programs conducted on or off campus. The district must apply to the commissioner of education for approval of such programs, which may be substituted for state graduation credit in physical education. Such approval may be granted under the following conditions.

(i) Olympic-level participation and/or competition includes a minimum of 15 hours per week of highly intensive, professional, supervised training. The training facility, instructors, and the activities involved in the program must be certified by the superintendent to be of exceptional quality. Students qualifying and participating at this level may be dismissed from school one hour per day. Students dismissed may not miss any class other than physical education.

(ii) Private or commercially-sponsored physical activities include those certified by the superintendent to be of high quality and well supervised by appropriately trained instructors. Student participation of at least five hours per week must be required. Students certified to participate at this level may not be dismissed from any part of the regular school day.

(8) Health education--one-half credit, which may satisfied by Health 1 or Advanced Health, or Health Science Technology--one credit, which may be satisfied by Introduction to Health Science Technology, Health Science Technology I, or Health Science Technology II.

(9) Speech--one-half credit. The credit must consist of Communication Applications.

(10) Technology applications--one credit, which may be satisfied by:

(A) the following courses in Chapter 126 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Applications): Computer Science I, Computer Science II, Desktop Publishing, Digital Graphics/Animation, Multimedia, Video Technology, Web Mastering, or Independent Study in Technology Applications, or state-approved technology applications innovative courses;

(B) the following courses in Chapter 120 of this title (relating to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Business Education): Business Computer Information Systems I or II, Business Computer Programming, Telecommunications and Networking, or Business Image Management and Multimedia;

(C) the following courses in Chapter 123 of this title (relating to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Education/Industrial Technology Education): Computer Applications, Technology Systems (modular computer laboratory-based), Communications Graphics (modular computer laboratory-based), or Computer Multimedia and Animation Technology; or

(D) the completion of three credits (for students participating in a coherent sequence of career and technology courses or who are enrolled in a Tech Prep high school plan of study) consisting of two or more state-approved career and technology courses in Chapters 119 - 125 and 127 of this title. Districts shall ensure that career and technology courses, including innovative courses, in a coherent sequence used to meet the technology applications credit are appropriate to collectively teach the knowledge and skills found in any of the approved courses listed in subparagraphs (A), (B), and (C) of this paragraph. Students pursuing the technology applications option described in this subparagraph must demonstrate proficiency in technology applications prior to the beginning of Grade 11.

(11) Fine arts--one credit, which may be satisfied by any course in Chapter 117, Subchapter C, of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Fine Arts).

(c) Elective Courses--three and one-half credits. The credits may be selected from the list of courses specified in §74.61(g) of this title (relating to High School Graduation Requirements). All students who wish to complete the Recommended High School Program are encouraged to study each of the four foundation curriculum areas (English language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies) every year in high school.

(d) Substitutions. No substitutions are allowed in the Recommended High School Program, except as specified in this chapter.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.63 adopted to be effective September 1, 2005, 29 TexReg 9357; amended to be effective January 9, 2007, 32 TexReg 80

§74.64: Distinguished Achievement High School Program--Advanced High School Program

(a) Credits. A student must earn at least 26 credits to complete the Distinguished Achievement High School Program.

(b) Core Courses. A student must demonstrate proficiency in the following:

(1) English language arts--four credits. The credits must consist of English I, II, III, and IV (English I for Speakers of Other Languages and English II for Speakers of Other Languages may be substituted for English I and II only for immigrant students with limited English proficiency).

(2) Mathematics--four credits. The credits must consist of Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry and an additional SBOE-approved mathematics course for which Algebra II is a prerequisite.

(3) Science--four credits. The credits must consist of a biology credit (Biology, Advanced Placement (AP) Biology, or International Baccalaureate (IB) Biology), a chemistry credit (Chemistry, AP Chemistry, or IB Chemistry), a physics credit (Physics, AP Physics, or IB Physics), and an additional approved laboratory-based science course. After successful completion of a biology course, a chemistry course, and a physics course, a student may select the fourth required credit from any of the following laboratory-based courses:

(A) Earth and Space Science;

(B) Environmental Systems;

(C) Aquatic Science;

(D) Astronomy;

(E) Anatomy and Physiology of Human Systems;

(F) AP Biology;

(G) IB Biology

(H) AP Chemistry;

(I) IB Chemistry;

(J) AP Physics;

(K) IB Physics;

(L) AP Environmental Science;

(M) IB Environmental Systems;

(N) Scientific Research and Design; and

(O) Engineering.

(4) Social studies--three and one-half credits. The credits must consist of World History Studies (one credit), World Geography Studies (one credit), United States History Studies Since Reconstruction (one credit), and United States Government (one-half credit).

(5) Economics, with emphasis on the free enterprise system and its benefits--one-half credit. The credit must consist of Economics with Emphasis on the Free Enterprise System and Its Benefits.

(6) Languages other than English--three credits. The credits earned must be for any three levels in the same language.

(7) Physical education--one and one-half credits to include Foundations of Personal Fitness (one-half credit).

(A) A student may not earn more than two credits in physical education toward state graduation requirements.

(B) The school district board of trustees may allow a student to substitute certain physical activities for the required credits in physical education, including the Foundations of Personal Fitness. The substitutions must be based on the physical activity involved in drill team, marching band, and cheerleading during the fall semester; Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC); athletics; Dance I-IV; and two- or three-credit career and technology work-based training courses.

(C) In accordance with local district policy, a school district may award up to two credits for physical education for appropriate private or commercially-sponsored physical activity programs conducted on or off campus. The district must apply to the commissioner of education for approval of such programs, which may be substituted for state graduation credit in physical education. Such approval may be granted under the following conditions.

(i) Olympic-level participation and/or competition includes a minimum of 15 hours per week of highly intensive, professional, supervised training. The training facility, instructors, and the activities involved in the program must be certified by the superintendent to be of exceptional quality. Students qualifying and participating at this level may be dismissed from school one hour per day. Students dismissed may not miss any class other than physical education.

(ii) Private or commercially-sponsored physical activities include those certified by the superintendent to be of high quality and well supervised by appropriately trained instructors. Student participation of at least five hours per week must be required. Students certified to participate at this level may not be dismissed from any part of the regular school day.

(8) Health education--one-half credit, which may be satisfied by Health 1 or Advanced Health, or Health Science Technology--one credit, which may be satisfied by Introduction to Health Science Technology, Health Science Technology I, or Health Science Technology II.

(9) Speech--one-half credit. The credit must consist of Communication Applications.

(10) Technology applications--one credit, which may be satisfied by:

(A) the following courses in Chapter 126 of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Applications): Computer Science I, Computer Science II, Desktop Publishing, Digital Graphics/Animation, Multimedia, Video Technology, Web Mastering, or Independent Study in Technology Applications, or state-approved technology applications innovative courses;

(B) the following courses in Chapter 120 of this title (relating to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Business Education): Business Computer Information Systems I or II, Business Computer Programming, Telecommunications and Networking, or Business Image Management and Multimedia;

(C) the following courses in Chapter 123 of this title (relating to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Technology Education/Industrial Technology Education): Computer Applications, Technology Systems (modular computer laboratory-based), Communications Graphics (modular computer laboratory-based), or Computer Multimedia and Animation Technology; or

(D) the completion of three credits (for students participating in a coherent sequence of career and technology courses or who are enrolled in a Tech Prep high school plan of study) consisting of two or more state-approved career and technology courses in Chapters 119 - 125 and 127 of this title. Districts shall ensure that career and technology courses, including innovative courses, in a coherent sequence used to meet the technology applications credit are appropriate to collectively teach the knowledge and skills found in any of the approved courses listed in subparagraphs (A), (B), and (C) of this paragraph. Students pursuing the technology applications option described in this subparagraph must demonstrate proficiency in technology applications prior to the beginning of Grade 11.

(11) Fine arts--one credit, which may be satisfied by any course in Chapter 117, Subchapter C, of this title (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Fine Arts).

(c) Elective Courses--two and one-half credits. The credits may be selected from the list of courses specified in §74.61(g) of this title (relating to High School Graduation Requirements). All students who wish to complete the Distinguished Achievement High School Program are encouraged to study each of the four foundation curriculum areas (English language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies) every year in high school.

(d) Advanced measures. A student also must achieve any combination of four of the following advanced measures. Original research/projects may not be used for more than two of the four advanced measures. The measures must focus on demonstrated student performance at the college or professional level. Student performance on advanced measures must be assessed through an external review process. The student may choose from the following options:

(1) original research/project that is:

(A) judged by a panel of professionals in the field that is the focus of the project; or

(B) conducted under the direction of mentor(s) and reported to an appropriate audience; and

(C) related to the required curriculum set forth in §74.1 of this title (relating to Essential Knowledge and Skills);

(2) test data where a student receives:

(A) a score of three or above on the College Board advanced placement examination;

(B) a score of four or above on an International Baccalaureate examination; or

(C) a score on the Preliminary Scholastic Assessment Test (PSAT) that qualifies the student for recognition as a commended scholar or higher by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation, as part of the National Hispanic Scholar Program of the College Board or as part of the National Achievement Scholarship Program for Outstanding Negro Students of the National Merit Scholarship Corporation. The PSAT score shall count as only one advanced measure regardless of the number of honors received by the student; or

(3) college academic courses, advanced technical credit courses, and dual credit courses, including local articulation, with a grade of 3.0 or higher.

(e) Substitutions. No substitutions are allowed in the Distinguished Achievement High School Program, except as specified in this chapter.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.64 adopted to be effective September 1, 2005, 29 TexReg 9357; amended to be effective January 9, 2007, 32 TexReg 80

Subchapter AA

§74.1001: College Readiness Vertical Team

(a) Purpose. In accordance with the Texas Education Code (TEC), §28.008, the purpose of a college readiness vertical team is to develop or establish standards and expectations designed to ensure that graduates of Texas high schools are able to perform college-level course work at institutions of higher education.

(b) Composition.

(1) The college readiness vertical team shall be comprised of four subject-specific vertical teams, one each to address English language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies.

(2) Each subject-specific vertical team shall be composed of a minimum of eight and a maximum of 20 members per team who represent:

(A) all levels of secondary public education;

(B) institutions of higher education;

(C) a balance between small and large districts;

(D) various geographic regions of the state; and

(E) the overall demographics of the state.

(3) A maximum of 60% of each subject-specific vertical team's membership shall be composed of faculty from institutions of higher education.

(4) Upon completion of the development of college readiness standards as required in the TEC, §28.008(b)(1), the subject-specific vertical teams shall be reconstituted to include a maximum of 60% secondary public education teachers employed full time in Texas public schools. The reconstituted teams shall complete duties as defined in the TEC, §28.008(b)(2) - (5).

(5) Representatives from each of the four subject-specific vertical teams shall form a leadership team for the purpose of alignment across English language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies.

(c) Appointment.

(1) The commissioner of education shall determine the criteria for selecting public education members for the college readiness vertical team.

(2) The commissioner of education shall solicit recommendations for possible appointees to the college readiness vertical team from the State Board of Education (SBOE), school districts, open-enrollment charter schools, the business community, and educational organizations in Texas. Recommendations may be accepted from any Texas resident. Nominations shall not be made by or accepted from any textbook publishers; authors; depositories; agents for textbook publishers, authors, or depositories; or any person who holds any official position with a textbook publisher, author, depository, or agent.

(3) The SBOE shall be notified of appointments made by the commissioner of education to the college readiness vertical team.

(4) Initial appointments to the college readiness vertical team shall be made no later than January 7, 2007, or as soon as practicable.

(5) Public education members of the college readiness vertical team may be removed or replaced at the discretion of the commissioner of education.

(d) Duties.

(1) The college readiness vertical team shall carry out the duties as defined in the TEC, §28.008(b).

(2) In accordance with the TEC, §28.008(f), the duties of the college readiness vertical team shall be concluded no later than September 1, 2011.

(3) Members of the subject-specific vertical teams may be required to be present at the SBOE meeting at which standards developed or established by the teams are presented or considered for approval.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §74.1001 adopted to be effective January 7, 2007, 31 TexReg 10797