§749.2001: What do certain words mean in this subchapter?

These words have the following meaning in this subchapter:

(1) Chemical restraint--A type of emergency behavior intervention that uses chemicals or pharmaceuticals through topical application, oral administration, injection, or other means to immobilize or sedate a child as a mechanism of control. The use of medications that have a secondary effect of immobilizing or sedating a child, but are prescribed by a treating health-care professional and administered solely for medical or dental reasons, is not chemical restraint and is not regulated as such under this chapter.

(2) De-escalation--See §749.43(13) of this title (relating to What do certain words and terms mean in this chapter?).

(3) Emergency behavior intervention--See §749.43(17) of this title.

(4) Emergency medication--A type of emergency behavior intervention that uses chemicals or pharmaceuticals through topical application, oral administration, injection, or other means to modify a child's behavior. The use of medications that have a secondary effect of modifying a child's behavior, but are prescribed by a treating health-care professional and administered solely for medical or dental reasons (e.g. benadryl for an allergic reaction or medication to control seizures), is not emergency medication and is not regulated as such under this chapter.

(5) Emergency situation--A situation in which attempted preventative de-escalatory or redirection techniques have not effectively reduced the potential for injury and it is immediately necessary to intervene to prevent:

(A) Imminent probable death or substantial bodily harm to the child because the child attempts or continually threatens to commit suicide or substantial bodily harm; or

(B) Imminent physical harm to another because of the child's overt acts, including attempting to harm others. These situations may include aggressive acts by the child, including serious incidents of shoving or grabbing others over their objections. These situations do not include verbal threats or verbal attacks.

(6) Mechanical restraint--A type of emergency behavior intervention that uses the application of a device to restrict the free movement of all or part of a child's body in order to control physical activity.

(7) Personal restraint--A type of emergency behavior intervention that uses the application of physical force without the use of any device to restrict the free movement of all or part of a child's body in order to control physical activity. Personal restraint includes escorting, which is when a caregiver uses physical force to move or direct a child who physically resists moving with the caregiver to another location.

(8) PRN--See §749.43(43) of this title.

(9) Prone restraint--Placing a child in a chest down restraint hold.

(10) Seclusion--A type of emergency behavior intervention that involves the involuntary separation of a child from other residents and the placement of the child alone in an area from which the resident is prevented from leaving by a physical barrier, force, or threat of force.

(11) Short personal restraint--A personal restraint that does not last longer than one minute before the child is released.

(12) Supine restraint--Placing a child in a chest up restraint hold.

(13) Transitional hold--The use of a temporary restraint technique that lasts no longer than one minute as part of the continuation of a longer personal or mechanical restraint.

(14) Triggered review--A review of a specific child's placement, treatment plan, and orders or recommendations for intervention, because a certain number of interventions have been made within a specified period of time.

Comments

Source Note: The provisions of this §749.2001 adopted to be effective January 1, 2007, 31 TexReg 7469; amended to be effective June 1, 2008, 33 TexReg 4196